Daša Drndić

In 2008 Sonnenschein was awarded the “Cyclops” Prize for the best novel of the year 2007, the “Fran Galović” prize as best prose work of the year 2007, and was nominated for the “Jutarnji list” award for the best prose work of the previous year. Her books have been translated into English, French, Polish, Hungarian, Slovenian, Dutch and Slovak.

 

Born August 10, 1946 in Zagreb, Croatia. Graduated from the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Philology, Department of English Language and Literature. As Fulbright fellow, completes her Master’s Degree in Theatre and Communications in the USA, then her doctorate on protofeminism and the Left, at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Rijeka, Croatia. Assistant Professor. For over twenty years worked as editor, producer and writer in the Drama Department of Radio Belgrade. She has written some thirty radio plays and produced over fifteen features that have been broadcast in Croatia and abroad. She also worked as a high-school teacher of English, as an editor in the publishing house «Vuk Karadžić», Belgrade, as a kindergarten teacher in Rijeka, as an assistant for education at the UNHCR office in Rijeka, as a lecturer and immigrant for the Croatian and Serbian languages  at the University of Toronto, Canada. Published prose and poetry in literary journals throughout former Yugoslavia. Translates from and into English. Novelist. Her books have been translated into English, French, Polish, Hungarian, Slovenian, Dutch, Slovak, while excerpts of her work appear in a number of other languages.

Books of prose: Put do subote (The Road to Saturday), Belgrade 1982, Kamen s neba (The Stone from Heaven), Belgrade 1984, Marija Czestochowska još uvijek roni suze ili Umiranje u Torontu (The Black Madonna), Rijeka-Zagreb 1997, Canzone di guerra, Zagreb 1998,  Totenwande, Zagreb 2000, Doppelgänger, Belgrade 2002, The False Teeth of Lila Weiss, Toronto Slavic Quarterly, no. 9,2004, Leica format, Zagreb - Belgrade 2003, After Eight, literary critiques, Zagreb 2005, Doppelgänger, Zagreb 2005, Feministički rukopis ili politička parabola: Drame Lillian Hellman (A Feminist Manuscript or a Political Parable: The Plays of Lillian Hellman), Ženska infoteka, Zagreb 2006, Sonnenschein, Fraktura, Zagreb 2007, April in Berlin, Fraktura, Zagreb 2009, and Belladonna, Fraktura, Zagreb 2012.  

In 2008 Sonnenschein was awarded the “Cyclops” Prize for the best novel of the year 2007, the “Fran Galović” prize as best prose work of the year 2007, and was nominated for the “Jutarnji list” award for the best prose work of the previous year. In 2004 the novel Leica format was nominated for the literary prizes of «Jutarnji list» and «Vjesnik», as well as for those of «Gjalski» and «Cyclops», and in 2005 her literary critiques After Eight  for the «Cyclops» award, as well as April in Berlin in 2009, which was also nominated for the “Jutarnji list” literary award in 2010. She writes essays and literary criticism for Third Programme of Croatian Radio, for literary journals and daily papers (“Sarajevo Notebooks”, “Zarez”, “Književna republika”, “Tvrđa”, “Europski glasnik”, “Kruh i ruže”, “Nova Istra”, “Novi Kamov”, “Novi list”, etc.)  

As freelance writer presently lives in Rijeka, Croatia.

From 1968 to 1991 she was a member of the Association of Literary Translators of Serbia.

She is president of the Society of Single Parents – “Minus One”.

Member of the Croatian Writers’ Society and Croatian P.E.N. Centre.

E-mail: ddrndic@ffri.hr and dasa.drndic@inet.hr




Daša Drndić Dies

The award-winning, critically acclaimed Croatian novelist, Daša Drndić passed away this June in Rijeka at the age of 71. She boldly took on difficult subject matter in her novels from fascism to cancer. Her novel Sonnenschein (2007) won multiple awards in Croatia and the English translation (Trieste) was shortlisted for an international literary prize, as was her novel Belladonna (2012). Holding a Bachelor’s Degree in English Literature and Philology from the University of Belgrade, a Master’s Degree in Theater and Communications from Case Western University and a PhD from the University of Rijeka, her career was long and varied. She was a novelist, a playwright, an editor, a literary critic, a translator, she worked for twenty years as a writer, producer and editor for Radio Belgrade and wrote more than thirty radio plays and fifteen features. She taught Modern British Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Rijeka. Her writing has been published in numerous literary magazines and her books, thirteen in total, have been translated into multiple languages. Read a poignant tribute to her and her work in the Guardian.

Daša Drndić's Belladonna Shortlisted for First EBRD Prize

The new prize, awarded by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, honors excellent English translations of books from countries where the bank operates- a vast stretch of land spanning from Central Europe to Central Asia. Dasa Drndic’s Belladonna, translated by Celia Hawkesworth, was shortlisted along with the Nobel Prize winner, Orhan Pamuk’s Red Woman. Tea Tulic’s novel, Hair Everywhere, which was translated by Coral Petkovich was longlisted for the prize. The 20,000 euro prize is split evenly between author and translator as the award intends to encourage more high quality English translations of authors from these regions. The winner will be announced in April, 2018.

Trieste Is Shortlisted

The shortlist for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize is announced, and Daša Drndić is on it!

Daša Drndić long-listed for the 2013 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize

Drndić was shortlisted for her novel Trieste, a story about Jews of Gorizia in Northeast Italy during World War II.
The Independent Foreign Prize honours the best work of fiction by a living author, which has been translated into English from any other language and published in the United Kingdom.

The Third Reich in Contemporary Fiction

RICHARD MARTIN
http://www.alluvium-journal.org

"The third and final novel that I would like to consider here – Daša Drndić’s Trieste (first published in Croatian in 2007 and in English in 2012) – features a much looser collage of historical materials. These include photographs, maps, transcripts (some taken from the Nuremberg Trials, others imagined), extensive footnotes and biographical summaries. These fragments seem to comprise the research archive of the novel’s central (fictional) character, Haya Tedeschi, who is searching for her son..."

Tainted Minds

MARK THOMPSON
The Times Literary Supplement, 01 June, 2012, Reviews, Fiction
Daša Drndić: TRIESTE
Translated by Ellen Elias-Bursać, 358pp. MacLehose Press

"With Trieste, the Croatian novelist and playwright Daša Drndić has bridged the gap between Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav fiction, between the work of Danilo Kis, say, writing in the Communist era, and that of Nenad Veličković or Vladimir Arsenijević, responding to the genocidal violence unleashed in the 1990s..."

Trieste, by Daša Drndić

Amanda Hopkinson

The Independent

Friday, 24 February 2012

This extraordinary work of fiction concludes with the narrator, Haya Tedeschi, reflecting on all she has compiled in eight long years of research and remembering. "I have arranged a multitude of lives, a pile of the past, into an inscrutable, incoherent series of occurrences... I have dug up all the graves of imagination and longing... I have rummaged through a stored series of certainties without finding a trace of logic."

Leica format

Extract from the novel "Leica format" by Daša Drndić

editions and awards:
Leica format, «Meandar», Zagreb, 2003,
Leica format , "Samizdat B92", Belgrade, 2003.
(Nominated for «Vjesnik», «Jutarnji list», «Vladimir Nazor» and «Kiklop» awards for Book of the year 2004)
Leica formátum, Nyitott Könyvműhely, Budapest 2010, translation Viktória Radics
Leica format, Društvo 2000, Ljubljana 2011, translation Sonja Polanc

review

Jonathon Bousfield Reviews the English Translation of Krleža's Journey to Russia

Krleža, a giant of 20th century European literature, is woefully undertranslated into English. Read Jonathon Bousfield’s compelling review of the master Krleza’s part travelogue, part prose account of the time he spent in Russia as a young man in the mid-1920s, Journey to Russia, which is accessible to English readers for the first time.

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Jonathon Bousfield on the Heyday of the Iconic Yugoslav Record Label, Jugoton

Jonathon Bousfield recounts the rise of Jugoton, the iconic Zagreb-based Yugoslavian record label that both brought Western music to Yugoslavia and later was at the forefront of the massive post-punk and new wave scenes in the region.

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Mirogoj Cemetery: An Architectural Jewel

Going to a cemetery may not be the first idea that pops into your mind when visiting a new city. But the stunning Mirogoj cemetery in Zagreb, which was designed by the renowned Austrian architect, Herman Bolle, is definitely worth a bit of your time. Read more below to find out why.

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You Haven't Experienced Zagreb if You Haven't Been to the Dolac Market

Dolac, the main city market, is a Zagreb institution. Selling all the fresh ingredients you need to whip up a fabulous dinner, from fruits and vegetables to fish, meat and homemade cheese and sausages, the sellers come from all over Croatia. Positioned right above the main square, the colorful market is a beacon of a simpler way of life and is just as bustling as it was a century ago.

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How to Spend a Spring Day in Zagreb

Wondering where to start exploring Croatia’s small but vibrant capital city, Zagreb? Check out Time Out’s list of must sees in Zagreb from the most famous market in town to where to sample the best rakija (local brandy).

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Croatian Phrases Translated into English

Do you find phrases and sayings give personality and flair to a language? Have you ever pondered how the culture and history of a place shape the common phrases? Check out some common sayings in Croatian with their literal translations and actual meanings below.

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Discover Croatia's Archaeological Secrets

Discover Croatia’s rich archaeological secrets, from the well known ancient Roman city of Salona near Split or the Neanderthal museum in Krapina to the often overlooked Andautonia Archaeological Park, just outside of Zagreb, which boasts the excavated ruins of a Roman town or the oldest continuously inhabited town in Europe, Vinkovci.

news

Nikola Tesla – Mind from the Future - Multimedia Exhibition in Zagreb

A spectacular multimedia exhibition honouring Nikola Tesla, one of the world’s greatest visionaries, titled ‘Nikola Tesla – Mind from the Future’, will stay open until 20 March 2018.
“Immersed into the magical world of the genius Nikola Tesla, by merging the elements of a ‘live’ film, video set design, computer game, and magical hologram and light adventure into a unique multimedia experience of extended reality, with this exhibition we seek to take you on a contemplative ‘journey’ without beginning or end, through a process of inspiration, creativity and production.” - Helena Bulaja Madunić, exhibition author

report

Hollywood and Dubrovnik

The medieval city in Croatia is having a geek-culture moment as the setting for King’s Landing in the HBO series “Game of Thrones”.
Hollywood seems to have discovered Dubrovnik. Parts of The Last Jedi, the eighth episode in the Star Wars saga, also take place in the fortress town. Filming wrapped this year on a new Robin Hood film starring Taron Eagerton, Jamie Foxx, and Jamie Dornan (and produced by Leonard DiCaprio). The 25th James Bond film is reported to begin shooting in the city in January 2018.
But not everyone appreciates all the attention.

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Great films shot in Zagreb

There's a surprising raft of indelible productions shot in and around Croatia's capital, like the world-dominating spy-caper 'James Bond: From Russia with Love' and Orson Welles' interpretation of Kafka's absurd, existentialist novel 'The Trial'...

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LitLink Thoughts. The Publisher's View by Mitch Albert, Periscope Books.

The curation of a festival of literature naturally entails the “curation” of its participants. Lit Link excelled in this regard – the authors invited from the UK represented a very fine, accomplished tranche of contemporary British writing, and the publishers, for the most part, represented a scrappy, independent ethos and pride in advancing thought-provoking fiction and literary fiction in translation.

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LitLink. The Editor's View. By: Anna Kelly

As far as I know, LitLink festival is unique. Each year it takes a group of writers and publishers to three Croatian cities – Pula, Rijeka, and Zagreb – for a series of evening readings. Along the way there are coach journeys on winding roads, stunning vistas of deep green fields and icy mountains, excellent Croatian wine and food, sea swimming, plenty of book chat...

report

A very rough guide to LitLink. The Author's View. By: Joanna Kavenna

Each night there is a bilingual Croatian-English event. Translations are projected behind the writers as they read. It becomes apparent that many contemporary Croatian writers are high ironists, forging dark comedy from aspects of life that most disturb them – war, corruption, the riotous hypocrisy of those who claim to govern us.
The tour runs from Zagreb to Pula to Rijeka...

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Croatian Sites on UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List

A little know fact is that Croatia, together with Spain, have the most cultural and historical heritage under the protection of UNESCO, and Croatia has the highest number of UNESCO intangible goods of any European country.

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Croatian National Theatre in Zagreb

The National Theater in Zagreb, Croatia’s capital, is one of those things which always finds its way to every visitor’s busy schedule.

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Zagreb Festivals and Cultural Events

Numerous festivals, shows and exhibitions are held annually in Zagreb. Search our what's on guide to arts & entertainment.

Authors' pages

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