prose

Željka Horvat Čeč: Selected Poems

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

Željka Horvat Čeč was born in 1986 in Čakovec. She has published two collections of poems, a collection of short stories and a short novel titled 4 Locks (2016). She holds a master's degree in Croatian Language and Literature and lives in Rijeka.

review

Joanna Kavenna: Come to the Edge

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

Joanna Kavenna is a British novelist, essayist and travel writer who grew up in various parts of Britain. Her first book, The Ice Museum (2005), came about as a result of her travels through Scandinavia and Northern Europe and was well received by critics. Her next book, a novel, Inglorious (2007), won the Orange Broadband Award for New Writers. Her subsequent novels are The Birth of Love (2010), Come to the Edge (2012) and A Field Guide to Reality (2016). Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, the Guardian, the Times Literary Supplement, and the International Herald Tribune among other publications. She was named by Granta magazine as one of the Best Young British Novelists in 2013.

Kavenna will be reading a passage from her novel, Come to the Edge, and discussing her work as a participant in the 2017 Lit Link Festival which will take place in Pula (June 29th), Rijeka (June 30th), and Zagreb (July 1st).

interview

Samantha Harvey: Dear Thief

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

Samantha Harvey was born in 1975 in Kent, England. She has a master’s degree in Philosophy and an MA in Creative Writing. She won the Betty Trask prize for her first novel, The Wilderness (2009), which was also shortlisted for The Guardian First Book Award and the Orange Prize for fiction and longlisted for the Man Booker prize. Her subsequent novels, All is Song (2012) and Dear Thief (2014) also received an excellent critical reception. Dear Thief was longlisted for the 2015 Bailey’s Prize for Fiction and shortlisted for the 2015 James Tate Black Memorial Prize for Fiction. Her short stories have been published in Granta magazine and appeared on BBC Radio 4.

Harvey will be reading a passage from her most recent novel, Dear Thief, and answering questions as part of the 2017 Lit Link Festival which will take place in Pula (June 29th), Rijeka (June 30th), and Zagreb (July 1st).

interview

David Szalay: All That Man Is

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

David Szalay’s prose has been described by the New York Times as “…frequently brilliant, remarkable for its grace and economy.” (New York Times, October 2016). The Canadian born British author’s latest novel, All That Man Is, was shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize. Szalay’s previous two novels, Spring (2011) and The Innocent (2009), were also met with critical acclaim and he was awarded the Betty Trask and Geoffrey Faber prizes for his debut novel, London and the Southeast (2008). Szalay attended Oxford University and has written radio dramas for the BBC. Granta magazine named him as one of the Best Young British Novelists in 2013.

Szalay will be reading a passage from his novel, All That Man Is, and discussing his work as a participant in this year's Lit Link Festival, which will be held in Pula (June 29th), Rijeka (June 30th) and Zagreb (July 1st).

prose

Igor Rajki: Carnal Parasite

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

Igor Rajki (1965, Zagreb) is a prolific author with a unique style leaning towards unconventional expression, experimentation, linguistic interplay and a peculiar sense of humor. He has published five novels, six short story collections, youth fiction, radio plays and dramas and his works have been performed on stage as well. Two of his novels, Truth Detector (2012) and Carnal Parasite (2014) were shortlisted for the most prominent Croatian award for novels, the T-Portal Award.

Below is an excerpt from Rajki's novel, Carnal Parasite

news

Lit Link Festival 2017 in Pula, Rijeka and Zagreb

The 'Lit Link Festival' in Croatia (or 'Književna karika' - in Croatian) is a three-day literary tour whose participants are writers, editors and publishers. This year the motto of the Lit Link Festival is “Despite Brexit” and the guests are British writers, editors and publishers.
The festival consists of three evening readings in which both Croatian authors and British authors participate. The readings will take place in the coastal cities of Pula (29th June, Centar Rojc) and Rijeka (30th June, Astronomski centar), as well as the inland capital, Zagreb (1st July, Club Močvara/Mochvara).

panorama

Jonathan Bousfield: Welcome to Hofbauerland

The publication of comic-strip collection Mister Morgen confirms Igor Hofbauer’s status as the unrivalled master of Croatian grotesque.
While Hofbauer’s poster designs represent a playful exercise in trash horror, his narrative strips are a much darker affair, featuring tales of obsession, anguish, and impending apocalypse.

prose

Jelena Zlatar Gamberožić: The Desk

Jelena Zlatar Gamberožić is the author of a collection of short stories, Odjavna karta (A Farewell Card) (2014), and a novel, Slijepa točka (Blind Spot) (2015), as well as numerous scientific articles. She received her PhD. in Sociology from the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in 2012. One of her short stories won the Kritična masa/Critical Mass Prize for Young Authors in 2016. She works at the Institute for Social Research in Zagreb.
The following short story, "The Desk", from Zlatar's collection of short stories, Odjavna Karta, originally appeared in the online literary magazine, Underpass.

review

How Are You? by Barbara Matejčić, a review

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

"From time to time, a literary work would appear that would succeed in giving a voice to the voiceless ones. How Are You?, an excellent collection of short stories by a Croatian journalist and writer Barbara Matejčić, is one of these literary works.
The author has spent a period of her life with her characters, being with them, helping them and listening to their stories, and her method is hence intrinsically one typical of investigative journalism."
Saša Ilić, eurolitnetwork.com

CM extensions

Film festivals in Croatia

The Croatian Audiovisual Centre currently co-finances 59 film festivals and other audiovisual events. These serve various functions: they are particularly important for promoting Croatian audiovisual creation and serve as a platform for screening artistic content and non-commercial film forms, which makes them relevant on a local, regional, national and, in some cases, international level.

news

Croatian film at this year’s Cannes: Dubravka Turić’s Cherries in Directors’ Fortnight

The short feature film ‘Trešnje’ (Cherries) by Dubravka Turić has been included in the The Directors’ Fortnight selection of the Cannes Film Festival – which will be held from 18 – 28 May 2017 in Cannes.
Dubravka Turić’s recently won best short film at the 72nd International Film Festival in Venice for Belladonna and is excited with the news that Trešnje has made the selection in Cannes.
"We also must not forget that Croatian film now has a long-lasting continuity in Cannes. Extraordinary films like ‘Kokoška’ from Una Gunjak, ‘Zvizdan’ by Dalibor Matanić, and last year’s excellent ‘Zvir’ from Miroslav Sikavica, have surely contributed to greater interest in the Croatian movie,” said director Dubravka Turić.

prose

Robert Vrbnjak: The Monument to the Unknown Buyer

"At noon on August 16th, when the sun was shining at its brightest, a man pushed a loaded shopping cart out of the cozy, air-conditioned atmosphere of a Liburnian supermarket. The man was no one special. Balding, between sixty to sixty-five years of age and wearing a Mickey Mouse t-shirt and flip-flops, he headed toward the parking lot, then suddenly stopped and pulled a piece of paper from his pocket (later found to be a receipt)... And then, under that hot Liburnian sun, he got sick."

essay

Dubravka Ugrešić: The Spirit of the Kakanian Province

"While I was leafing through a few Croatian Kakanian novels (which I'd last cracked in high school), I felt I was working not with literary texts but genes. It was like discovering something we have always known but failed to attend to, like discovering a birthmark exactly where it was on our parents, children, grandchildren. At the same time, the literary critic in me grumbled while reading the ongoing episodes of these provincial literary soap operas, which have been going on for a century."

interview

An interview with Zdenko Franjić

Starting out in 1987, Croatian record label Slusaj Najglasnije! (or Listen Loudest!) documented many of Croatia’s greatest bands, including Majke, Hali Gali Halid, Satan Panonski, Bambi Molestors, and many others. Over time, Listen Loudest! evolved, and today releases music from artists the world around. The mastermind behind Listen Loudest, Zdenko Franjic, has been kept his label/life mission together for over thirty years without a break.

report

The Little Black Egg: a punk excursion to Croatia

"It’s called Rijecki Novi Val. (Novi Val is Croatian for New Wave.) This is one of the best collections of anything I ever acquired. Punk and New Wave were huge in the Balkans. I said it once, and I’ll say it again: the ex-YU countries are responsible for the some of the best punk music made anywhere."

panorama

Jonathan Bousfield: Rijeka Rock City

It was the port city of Rijeka that led the way when it came to Croatia’s relationship with the electric guitar, and it is Rijeka that preserves most in terms of rock and roll heritage today. Label boss Goran Lisica Fox famously described Rijeka as a ‘musical Galapagos’, a self-contained city that always stood apart from the main landmass of popular culture. Indeed the city’s position in Croatia can be compared to that of Manchester in the UK: a place whose mixture of provincial isolation and self-reliance paradoxically puts it at the centre of national creativity.

prose

Dalibor Šimpraga: Gateway to Dalmatia (Ghosts)

Dalibor Šimpraga’s publishing credits include his novel, Anastasia (2007), a collection of short stories, Kavice Andreja Puplina (2002), and an anthology of new Croatian prose of the 1990s, 22 u hladu (2002). He is a cultural editor for the widely circulated weekly magazine, Globus. He co-founded the literary magazine, Fantom slobode. His debut novel, Anastasia (2007), received the well-respected t-portal prize for best novel of the year.
Born in Zagreb in 1969, he still resides there and graduated from the University of Zagreb with a degree in Croatian and Southern Slavic Literature and Linguistics.

news

World Literature Today on Dubravka Ugrešić - the laureate of the 2016 Neudstadt Prize

Dubravka Ugrešić’s work takes center stage in the most recent issue of World Literature Today. She is the winner of the 2016 Neustadt Prize.

prose

Roman Simić: Foxes

Roman Simić is a poet, an author and an editor. He has written a book of poetry and three collections of short stories. He is the Artistic Director for the "Festival of the European Short Story", an annual festival held in Croatia since 2002. He is also an editor for the Croatian literary magazine, Relations, which is published in foreign languages. His book, U što se zaljubljujemo (What Are We Falling in Love With) received the prestigious Jutarnji list prize (2005) for the best book of prose. His award winning short stories have been translated into many languages.
Roman Simić was born in Zadar and holds a degree in Comparative Literature and Spanish Language and Literature from the University of Zagreb. He resides in Zagreb and works as an editor.

panorama

20 Essential Films for an Introduction to Yugoslavian Cinema

Once upon a time there was a country, and that country made films. The films produced in the former Yugoslavia remain fascinating for anyone interested in the country or in films. This list is by no means definitive, for Yugoslav cinema is too rich and varied for that. It is rather, a primer for those unfamiliar with the region, the best bits from each era and each generation.

poezija

Gordana Benić: Four poems

Poet, journalist and a winner of the most prestigious poetry award 'Goranov vijenac', Gordana Benić was born in Split in 1950. She studied Croatian literature and philosophy in Zadar, completing her postgraduate studies in literature in Zagreb. For years she worked in Slobodna Dalmacija, the local paper, concentrating on historical monuments. In 2000 she received the Vicko Andrić conservation award for her articles on national historical monuments. Her poetry can be regarded as part of a significant movement in Croatian literature, that of the prose poem, which continues to resist fashionable trends and the commercial demands of a national literary marketplace made up as it goes along. Benić is indisputably one of the most important figures in that movement.

panorama

Peristil - Red, Green, Black and Yellow: Split Street Culture

The first art intervention on Peristil took place on January 11 of 1968. That morning the citizens woke up to a shock of seeing one of the main squares painted red. It did not take long to found out who were the perpetrators. A group of students (Pavao Dulčić, Tomo Čaleta, Vladimir Dodig – Trokut, Slaven Sumić, Nenad Đapić, Radovan Kogej, Srđan Blažević i Denis Dokić) spilled red paint on the square as a presentation of their dissatisfaction with the political and artistic scene of the time. The action is still mystified and serves as an inspiration for many other actions.
/by Mario Vuksa/

panorama

Croatian Design Superstore: These are Croatia's most loved designs and ideas one can bring home

Many try to create new and authentic souvenirs that would remind the tourists of an unforgettable holiday in our lovely country. One thing remains unclear: if Croatia is so fantastic, why do we need to praise it so much? And exaggerate? Instead, the authors decided to inaugurate a completely new concept and give a humble and objective presentation.

news

Slobodan Šnajder the winner of T-portal 2016 literary award

The finalists were the novels “The Brass Times” by Slobodan Šnajder, “Alone by the Sea” by Zoran Ferić, “No Signal Area” by Robert Perišić, “Skin-coloured Cloud” by Nebojša Lujanović, and “Your Son Huckleberry Finn” by Bekim Sejranović.

prose

Ivan Sršen: Harmattan

Ivan Sršen’s novel Harmattan deftly tracks the plight of Uhunoma, a young Nigerian woman caught in the logic-defying limbo of the German penal system for doing nothing more than trying to live a better life. But as Uhunoma learns as she comes to terms with the circumstances that have delivered her and other women to this facility, the abyss of European Union bureaucracy has little interest in the individuals whom are subjected to its whims, the same as the unforgiving Saharan
winter wind, which the novel is named after, cares not about what it relentlessly covers and smothers with dust year after year. While Uhunoma’s only crime was entering Europe without the proper papers, her incarceration brings her into close contact with myriad criminals from all over Africa and Eastern Europe—drug dealers, murderers, and women forced to make tough decisions just to survive. Harmattan tells a story that is becoming all too universal as borders the world over become more porous and less defined, both literally and figuratively. The implications of this on the human spirit transcend all boundaries.
AUTHOR BIO: Born in 1979. In 2007 he started the Zagreb-based
independent publisher Sandorf and he is also an editor, translator, writer, and literary agent. Prior to Harmattan, published in 2014 by Durieux, Sršen had published a book of short stories (2010) and a popular study on the history of Zagreb’s libraries (2010; co-authored by Daniel Glavan).
He has translated from English Croatian editions of Get in the Van by Henry Rollins and The Real Frank Zappa Book by Frank Zappa. Along with two other translators, he translated selected works of Robert Graves to Croatian, and edited Zagreb Noir for Akashic Books, while still writing novels and short stories.

panorama

Croatian Sites on UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List

A little know fact is that Croatia, together with Spain, have the most cultural and historical heritage under the protection of UNESCO, and Croatia has the highest number of UNESCO intangible goods of any European country.

panorama

Map world literature - Croatia

As could be expected given the upheaval in this part of the world throughout much of the 20th and 21st century, social issues and questions of identity figure strongly with many Croatian writers. Older and more conservative/right-wing writers are sometimes preoccupied with national identity, whereas younger authors tend to have a more diversified approach, looking at subcultural themes, gender/sexuality, social problems, economic migration, etc. There is a lot of sensitive, experimental and generally eye-opening literature to be discovered.

prose

Rumena Bužarovska: I don't want to eat

Rumena Bužarovska (Skopje, Macedonia, 1981) is one of 10 New Voices from Europe 2016, selected by Literary Europe Live, and one of the most popular translated authors in Croatia. Bužarovska is the author of three short story collections – Čkrtki (Scribbles, Ili-ili, 2007), Osmica (Wisdom Tooth, Blesok, 2010) and Mojot maž (My Husband, Blesok, 2014; Ili-ili, 2015). She is a literary translator from English into Macedonian and her translations include Lewis Carroll (Through the Looking Glass), J.M. Coetzee (The Life and Times of Michael K), Truman Capote (In Cold Blood) and Richard Gwyn (The Colour of a Dog Running Away). She is Assistant Professor of American Literature at the State University of Skopje in the Republic of Macedonia.

panorama

Dancing under socialism: rare electronic music from Yugoslavia

In the last couple of years, various collections of electronic music from former Yugoslavia popped up, ranging from numerous downloadable CDR mixtapes to official compilation albums. Yet there are several more waiting in line to be pressed and, as you will see, these are most definitely worth waiting for.

news

First Croatian newspaper for asylum-seekers, refugees launched

The monthly publication was launched with the aim of establishing closer mutual trust and offering information to people who were forced to leave their homes in search of protection and security, it was said at the launch.
Most of the newspapers' authors are asylum-seekers.

poetry

Ivana Bodrožić: Selected poems

Selected poems from "First Step into Darkness" and "Wild Animals Crossing"
Translated from Croatian by Majda and Damir Šodan

Ivana Bodrožić was born in Vukovar in 1982. In 2005, she published her first poetry collection entitled Prvi korak u tamu (The First Step into Darkness) as part of the Goran Award for young poets.
Her first novel Hotel Zagorje (Hotel Tito) was published in 2010. The novel has been published at numerous respectful publishing houses and received a prestigious Prix Ulysee for the best debut novel in France, as well as numerous important awards in Croatia and the Balkan area such as the Kočićevo Pero Award, Josip and Ivan Kozarac Award, and Kiklop Award for the best work of fiction in 2010.
She has since published her second poetry collection Prijelaz za divlje životinje (A Road for Wild Animals) and a short story collection 100% pamuk (100% Cotton), which has also received a regional award.
Her works have been translated to German, French, Czech, Danish, Slovenian, Spanish, Macedonian.

panorama

Ivan Kozarac

Croatian writer Ivan Kozarac entered the literary scene in 1902. During his short 8 years of active work (from 1902 to 1910) he produced sixty poems, 40 short stories and novellas, "Đuka Begović" novel and his autobiography. 
Ivan Kozarac was not a typical writer nor was he a part of dominant modernist Croatian poetic movement. He affirmed and legitimized himself as a poet of vitalism and decadency, a poet of passion, joy, euphoria but also a poet of exhaustion, dying and agony.
"Đuka Begović" novel was the height of his creative work.

poetry

Drago Glamuzina: Butchers

“Butchers” (Mesari), a collection of poems by Drago Glamuzina, won the Vladimir Nazor Book of the Year Award and the Kvirin Prize for the Best Book of Poetry in Croatia, and was translated into German, Macedonian and Slovene.
Glamuzina was born in Vrgorac in 1967. His publications include Mesari (Butchers, poetry, 2001), Tri (Three, a novel, 2008), Je li to sve (Is That All, poetry, 2009), Everest (poetry, 2016)...
“Love and jealousy through a clash of one body against another become the origins of speaking about life and the world in general. Glamuzina’s act of switching the idyllic love couple with a dramatic love triangle ignites the lyrical narration that spreads in different directions. (…) His “butchers” often cut at the most sensitive spots.” (K. Bagić)

panorama

Croatian National Theatre in Zagreb

The National Theater in Zagreb, Croatia’s capital, is one of those things which always finds its way to every visitor’s busy schedule.

poetry

Samuel (Srdjan) Sacher: Poems

Samuel (formerly known as Srdjan) Sacher is a composer, songwriter and poet. He was born 1955 in Zagreb, Croatia. Samuel studied archeology and ethnology at the University of Zagreb, but dropped out before graduation to pursue a professional music career. From 1980, he has been an active songwriter, singer and bass player in four Croatian bands - Haustor, Dee Dee Mellow, Brojani, and Vjestice. From the begining of his career, Samuel Sacher has been involved in TV and theatre production as a composer, songwriter or performer.

interview

Croatian-German writer Jagoda Marinić: 'Cultural identity is not absolute truth'

Jagoda Marinić is a prize-winning author, novelist, playwright, essayist, journalist and the head of the International Welcome Center in Heidelberg. She was born to Croatian parents and grew up bilingually. "Spiegel" called her 2007 debut novel "Die Namenlose" one of the most important new releases of that year. In 2013 she released "Restaurant Dalmatia" to critical acclaim. "Made in Germany. Was ist deutsch in Deutschland" was released in May 2016 in German.

panorama

10 Books by Women We Would Like to See Translated: Balkan Edition

Only a small fraction of fiction published in English is translated, and only about a quarter of that translated fiction was originally written by women. This is an unfortunate state of affairs. In the second installment of our series from around the world, highlighting works by women we’d love to see reaching an English audience, we offer a literary tour of the western Balkans—specifically, the rich literary territory encompassing Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, Macedonia, and Montenegro.

panorama

The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction: Croatia

The SF scene in Croatia is rapidly growing, with new names appearing regularly. Some authors have begun to see their work translated into English. New anthologies and awards mark the health of the field, giving hope that sf will continue to evolve in the region, and that young authors, who are already making their mark here, will finally be recognized worldwide.

poetry

Tin Ujević: Nocturne (six poems)

One of the great Croatian lyric poets in the 20th century, Tin Ujević (1891 – 1955) has hardly been translated at all into English. His Collected Works number 16 volumes, and he is greatly loved as a lyric poet in Croatia as well as all the other countries of former Yugoslavia. Tin is a writer of voluminous intellect, whose use of language, gentle musicality, purity of literary form and mournful, melancholic sensibility are reminiscent in many ways of Verlaine. He lived simply, and was a frequenter of bars and cafés.
Ujević was born in Vrgorac (Dalmatia). He lived at various times in Zagreb, Belgrade, Sarajevo, Split and Paris.

panorama

Who wants a selfie with a Croatian writer?

Andrea Pisac, a fiction writer and cultural anthropologist, takes her friend Linda for a walk through the magical Tuškanac forest and that's where this literary tour begins: not only did they learn about the greatest Croatian writers, but they also gave thanks to the amazing sculptors who immortalized them.

news

Croatia to promote fledgling authors at Frankfurt Book Fair

Selected young Croatian authors will appear at this year's Frankfurt International Book Fair on October 19-23 under the motto "They're coming - 7 magnificent young authors".

news

Literary festival "Europe In The Yard" to promote writers in Zagreb this autumn

The fourth edition of of the literary festival "Europe In The Yard" (Europea u Dvorištu) organised by the Ljevak publishing company will take place in Zagreb this autumn and winter.

poetry

Darija Žilić: The Slow Soul

Darija Žilić is a poet, literary critic, translator, moderator, and one of the editors of literary journal Tema, born in Zagreb in 1972. She graduated in comparative literature and history from the University of Zagreb. Her published works includes Breasts and Strawberries (poetry, 2005), To Write in Milk (Essays on Contemporary Poetry, 2008), Muse outside Ghetto: Essays on Contemporary Literature (Julije Benešić award for the best book by critics in Croatia in 2012), Nomads and hybrids: Essays on Contemporary Literature and Film (2010), Parallel Gardens: Interviews with Theorists, Writers and Activists (2010), Tropics: Critics about Contemporary Poetry (2011), Dance, Modesty, Dance (Kiklop award for the best poetry book in 2010 in Croatia), Omara (prose, 2012) and Tropics 2: critics about poetry, prose and society (2014.)

poetry

Irena Matijašević: No one's around

Irena Matijašević, born in Zagreb in 1965, graduated with a degree in English and comparative literature from Zagreb's Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. She served as a member of Croatian Semiotic Society’s board of directors and currently she works as an editor at Croatian Radio where she edits programs on poetry and literature, as well as on human sciences. Her work as a translator is marked by translations of theory, anthropological (Clifford Geertz, Interpretative Anthropology, 2010) and psychoanalytic (Anthony Elliott, Psychoanalytic Theory, 2012). Her publications include essays, published in literary magazines and newspapers, as well as three books of poetry: Naizgled (Seemingly, AGM, 2007), Južne životinje (Southern Animals, AGM, 2010) and Danska H20 (Dennmark H20, AGM, 2012). Her poems were translated into German, English, Slovakian, Swedish and Polish. In 2015 she published the novel Black Letter (Algoritam, Zagreb) and presently she is writing a novel Diary of the sea to be published by Hena.com in 2017.

poetry

Sonja Manojlović: I Remember Everything

Sonja Manojlović was born on March 15, 1948 in Zagreb. She graduated in philosophy and comparative literature from the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Zagreb. Her poems have been included in anthologies and translated into more than fifteen languages.

prose

Neven Vulić: The Crap Master

Neven Vulić was born in Zagreb in 1983. He graduated in French Language and Literature and in General Linguistics at the University of Zagreb.
He regularly writes literary reviews for magazines. His story was included in the „Bez vrata, bez kucanja“ anthology, a selection of short prose written by the youngest generation of Croatian authors. Vulić has worked for the Subversive Festival (Director of the Book Fair, editor-in-chief of all publications, panel organizer and moderator), he currently works as an editor in Naklada OceanMore publishing house. Bibliography: 'Nagni se kroz prozor' (Lean Out of the Window, a collection of stories), Celeber, Zagreb, 2006, 'Povijest bolesti' (History of My Disease, novel), Sysprint, Zagreb, 2010.

news

Europe's best indie novels listed in support of UK remaining in EU

The independent publisher Dedalus Books is making its own small case for remaining in the EU, with its “Reading Europe” promotion, a selection of novels from EU countries intended to “let the reader know the literature, history and culture of each country better”. They are all from UK independent publishers, all translated into English, and of course, two of them are Croatian.

news

French Translations of Eight Poetry Collections by Croatian Authors

Eight poetry books by Croatian poets and poetesses have been translated into French and published by the French publishing house L'Ollave within the edition "Domaine croate/ Poésie". The editor-in-chief Jean de Breyne launched this special edition in 2012 in order to introduce the readers with this very prolific and heterogeneous poetic production of whose existence the French public was previously almost completely unaware.

poetry

Branko Čegec: Advertisement For Death

Branko Čegec was born in Kraljev vrh in 1957. He is a poet, a critic, an essayist and a fiction writer who graduated from the Zagreb Faculty of Philosophy in Croatian Studies and Comparative Literature. He has been editor-in-chief of many newspapers and cultural magazines. His poetry has been included in various reviews and anthologies in Croatia and abroad and translated into English, German, French, Italian, Slovenian, Ukranian, Macedonian, Polish, Ruthenian, Hungarian and Lithuanian. His books include: Eros-Europe-Arafat (1980), West-East Sex (1983), The Makeover of the Avantgarde (1983), A Melancholy Chronicle (1988), The Screens of Emptiness (1992 and 2001), The Freedom Phantom (1994).

news

11 Books To Read This Spring According to Paper Magazine

In the wise words of Kylie Jenner, 2016 is the year of "realizing things." If you want to speed up the revelation process, books are a good way to go. In the selection below, we've found a nice surprise: a ''dazzling, funny and deadly serious novel with which a glorious new European voice has arrived'' (The Guardian) - Adios, Cowboy, by Olja Savičević Ivančević.

prose

Faruk Šehić: excerpt from 'Quiet Flows The Una'

EU Prize for Literature winner (2013), Faruk Šehić, was born in 1970 in Bihac. Until the war broke out in 1992, Šehić studied Veterinary Medicine in Zagreb. However, the then 22-year-old voluntarily joined the army of Bosnia and Herzegovina, in which he led a unit of 130 men as a lieutenant. Literary critics regard him as one of the most gifted young writers in the former Yugoslavia, as a shining light of the so-called 'knocked-over generation'. His books have been translated into English, German, Bulgarian, French and Macedonian. His debut novel „Knjiga o Uni“ (Quiet Flows The Una) was awarded the Meša Selimović prize for the best novel published in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and Croatia in 2011, and the European Union Prize for Literature 2013. He works for the magazine BH Dani as a columnist and journalist.

CM extensions

Croatia's Once Mighty Shoe Firm Finds its Feet

Vogue’s recognition of its Startas sneakers is only the latest sign that the humbled economic giant in Vukovar is on the way back up.

news

Star Wars Adds Shine to Croatian 'Pearl' Dubrovnik

The new Star Wars movie will be part-filmed in the Croatian resort of Dubrovnik in March, bringing the city additional prestige among film fans and marketing potential.

CM extensions

Review of 'The Smith Tapes: Lost Interviews with Rock Stars & Icons 1969 - 1972'

Howard Smith's classic interviews reveal how little America has changed: a blowhard public figure running for political office without having any political experience; media culture obsessed with celebrities; talking about race relations without being able to improve race relations. Sound familiar?

writers

Želimir Periš

prose

Želimir Periš: Greetings from Dalmatia

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

A story translated by Tomislav Kuzmanović

Želimir Periš was born in 1975 in Zadar, Croatia. He is a member of ZaPis, an association of Zadar based writers, where he organizes literary events and runs creative writing workshops called Otpis. Also, he is one of the organizers of Kalibar Festival of Literature in Zadar. His stories, plays and poems have been published in several literary magazines and included in prose anthologies. He has received multiple awards for his short stories and poetry. His stories have been translated into Italian, Ukrainian and English. His book of short stories, Mučenice, was translated and published in Slovenia, and adapted into a theatre play. In 2015, his novel Mima i kvadratura duga was nominated for the literary prize of „T-portal“- best novel of the year. Books of prose:
Mučenice (Martyrs), Zagreb, 2013., Mima i kvadratura duga (Mima and squaring the debt), Zagreb, 2014., Mima i vaše kćeri (Mima and your daughters), Zagreb, 2015.

prose

What draws an Englisman's attention to Kamov?

Janko Polić Kamov, a Croatian writer and a poet, died at a very young age, but left behind a major work of Croatian modernist literature: the novel ‘Isušena kaljuža’ (‘The Dried Up Mire’). Literary critics often agree that his work was way ahead of the worldwide movements which were to follow in the years after his death, like surrealism and modernism, with writers such as Joyce, Kafka and Camus later leading the way, and they often label Kamov’s work as ‘revolutionary’. However, Kamov’s novel and much of his work has never been translated into English and an Englishman living in Croatia, Martin Mayhew, is now working on translating Kamov’s important novel.

poetry

Petra Rosandić: Vita Minima

Petra Rosandić (Split, 1985) is a Croatian poet and former future choreographer who reaped an MA degree from the Faculty of philosophy, University of Split. Her works are published in Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian literary magazines, collections and antologies. Her first book of poetry, 'Ako dugo držiš usta otvorena' has been published in 2014, while
her manuscript in English, 'Why I died', has been selected as one of 25 semi-finalists for international award Tomaž Šalamun 2015 by the American magazine Verse.

poetry

Ivan Goran Kovačić: The pit

Illustration: Pablo Picasso, La Fosse Commune (The pit), Etching, 1947. From Ivan Goran Kovatchitch Book.

Ivan Goran Kovačić (1913 –1943) was a prominent Croatian poet and writer of the 20th century. Death is a central theme in much of Kovačić’s poetry, however this is not a reflection on his life outlook. His melancholy subjects came from outside events—such as his own and his brother’s affliction with tuberculosis—rather than from an internal disposition toward the morose. Jure Kaštelan, one of Kovačić's contemporaries, expressed that Kovačić was inclined both toward romanticism and realism in his poetry, and that Kovačić had an intense perception of life. His best known work is "Jama" (The Pit). His work is an example of anti-war poetry with messages against torture, mass murders and war crimes.

prose

Ivo Andrić: Of Words (Fragment from the book „Signs by the Roadside“)

Ivo Andrić (1892 –1975) was a novelist, short story writer, and the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature (1961).
The collection of notes entitled "Znakovi pored puta"/ "Signs by the roadside", published after Andrić’s death, can be best described as the writer's intellectual diaries. As may be imagined of a man who recoiled so consistently from any exposure of his private life and thoughts, Andrić was equally consistent in his dislike of the diary as a genre, seeing it as a misguided search for permanence.

poetry

Ivan Herceg: Poems

Ivan Herceg (1970, Krapina) is a Croatian poet, prose writer and editor, majored in Croatian language and literature studies and South-Slavic philology at Zagreb Faculty of Philosophy. He is the executive editor of the Zagreb-based journal Poezija, devoted exclusively to poetry, the assistant editor of Poezija’s book publishing section, and the co-organiser, along with Poezija’s editor-in-chief Ervin Jahić, of the SUR (Stih u regiji /Poetry in the Region/) Poetry Festival. He received several awards for his poetic work, and his poetry has been widely anthologised and translated into a dozen languages. Published works: Naša druga imena (poetry, 1994), Noć na asfaltu (poetry, 1996), Snimke zemaljskih uzdaha (poetry, 1997), Anđeli u koroti (poetry, Zagreb, 2004.), Nepravilnosti (poetry, 2007), Koliko naju bo ostalo (selected poems in Slovenian, 2009), Snimke zemaljskih uzdaha (poetry, 2010), Anđeli u koroti (poetry, 2011), Goli (short stories, 2011), Naša druga imena (selected poems in Polish, 2014), Nepravilnosti (poetry in Bulgarian, 2014).

panorama

Zagreb Festivals and Cultural Events

Numerous festivals, shows and exhibitions are held annually in Zagreb. Search our what's on guide to arts & entertainment.

review

Marin Franičević: Dobriša Cesarić and his unique poetry

Dobriša Cesarić (1902 –1980) was a Croatian poet and translator born in Požega. Despite his limited output, Cesarić is considered as one of the greatest Croatian poets of the 20th century.
His first appearance on the literary scene was when he was 14 years old, with a poem "I ja ljubim" (eng. "I too love") which was published in a magazine for the youth called "Pobratim" (eng. "Stepbrother"). His work as a poet consists of ten poem books and a few translations.
He translated from German, Russian, Italian, Bulgarian and Hungarian to Croatian.

The article had been written by Croatian poet Marin Franičević (Vrisnik 1911 - Zagreb 1990), and it was originally published in Most/The Bridge literary review in 1981.

review

Paul Gravett on Comics Culture in Yugoslavia: World-Class Innovators & Remarkable Visionaries

Gravett's decided to share his fascination with the guidebook 'The Comics We Loved: Selection Of 20th Century Comics & Creators From The Region Of Former Yugoslavia' by Živojin Tamburić, Zdravko Zupan & Zoran Stefanović.

review

Akashic Noir series: Zagreb Noir

Zagreb Noir, edited by Ivan Sršen, is the newest anthology in the bestselling noir series by Akashic Press. It all began in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir, and has expanded to include major cities around the world from Havana to Singapore. Zagreb Noir is a peek into the Croatian capital and is charged with dark humor and vivid atmosphere. With original stories from Croatian writers, this unique anthology not only captures literary Zagreb but many of the city’s more harrowing tales.

review

Socialism and Modernity: A Hidden History

Rick Poynor tries to correct the injustice: not so many designers in English-speaking countries know about the growth of graphic design and visual culture in central and eastern Europe after the Second World War.

poetry

Damir Šodan: The Afternoon of a Clown

Damir Šodan (1964, Split) is a poet, playwright, editor and translator who graduated from Zagreb University with a BA in English Literature and History. He has published four volumes of poetry: Sound Changes (1996), The Middle World (2001), Letters to a Wild Scythian, (2009) and Café Apollinaire (2013), two collections of plays: Safe Area (2002), The Night of the Long Beams (2009) and an anthology of contemporary Croatian "neorealist" poetry: Walk on the Other Side (2010). He was awarded the Držić prize for the burlesque Chick Lit (2012) and the 1st prize at the playwriting competition for ex-Yugoslav writers in Vienna (2000) for the dark comedy Safe Area. Internationally, his work has been among other featured in The American Poetry Review (2007), New European Poets, (Graywolf Press, USA, 2008), Les Poètes de la Méditerranée (Gallimard, 2010), The World Record and A Hundred Years' War (Bloodaxe, 2012 and 2014). He translated Raymond Carver, Leonard Cohen, Charles Bukowski, Charles Simic, Richard Brautigan and Frank O'Hara into Croatian. He is an associate editor of Poezija and Quorum magazines in Zagreb.

panorama

Animated films in Croatia to entertain and inspire

Watching Croatian movies is a great way to learn more about the country before an actual visit. And since cartoons are movies as well here is a list of what to see and what to expect from the world of Croatian animation.

review

Krleža seen by French critics

Six of Krleža's books have been translated into French: The Burial at Theresienburg (short stories, Editions de Minuit, translated by Antun Polanšćak, preface by Leon-Pierre Quint, Paris, 1956.), The Return of Philip Latinovicz (novel, edited by Calman-Lévy, translated by Mila Đorđević and Ciara Malraux, Paris, 1957.], The Banquet in Blithuania (novel, edited by Calman-Lévy, translated by Mauricette Beguitch, Paris, 1964.), I’m not Playing Anymore (novel, Edition de Seuil, translated by Janine Matillon, Paris, 1969.], Mars, Croatian God (short stories, Edition Calman-Lévy, translated by Janine Matillon and Antun Polanšćak, Paris, 1971.), The Ballads of Petritsa Kerempuh (Edition: Presses orientales de France, translated by Janine Matillon). All these books were well received. We give here some extracts from criticisms (Maurice Nadeau, Léon Pierre Quint, Claude Roy, Marcel Schneider, Robert Bréchon, Jean Bloch-Michel and others) who provide various insights into Krleža`s work.

The article was originally published in Most/The Bridge literary review (number 3-4, 1979).

panorama

Croatia: Historical Heritage, Art and Important Cultural Events

Although Croatia developed under the impact of many different cultures, it gave its own and unique imprint to the history of European civilization.

poetry

Milko Valent: Poems

Milko Valent, a highly prolific author born in 1948 in Zagreb, graduated from the University of Zagreb with a degree in philosophy and comparative literature. He has been a professional writer since the autumn of 1976, publishing poetry, short stories, novels, essays on philosophy and literature, polemics, theater criticism, and plays for radio and stage.

review

Rick Poynor on how he discovered Boris Bućan

How visiting Zagreb, while accompanied by the collegue taking you to unknown places and holding the key to the door, can end up with discovering one of Croatia's most prominent artists.

poetry

Mehmed Begić: Close your eyes so no to see flags

Mehmed Begić (1977) was born in Capljina, Bosnia and Herzegovina. He studied South Slavic languages and literature at Pedagogical Institute of Mostar, as well as comparative literature at the Faculty of Philosophy in Sarajevo. He has completed none of the above. Begić was one of the editors of magazine Kolaps.
He likes to believe that Kolaps is an ongoing dream, currently in hibernation. So far Begić published: L’Amore Al Primo Binocolo (1999) with Nedim Ćisić, Marko Tomaš and Veselin Gatalo, Tri puta trideset i tri jednako (2000) with Ćisić and Tomaš, Film (2001), with Lukasz Szopa, Čekajući Mesara (2002), Pjesme iz sobe (2006), Savršen metak u stomak (2010), Знам дека знаеш / Znam da znaš / I Know You Know (2012), Ponoćni razgovori (2013) with Marko Tomaš, Sitni sati u Managvi (2015).

panorama

A History of Eastern European Matchboxes

Although they were produced under strict state-controlled production processes; that were aimed at exploiting them as a means of publicizing political initiatives, promoting public health and safety, and selling the communist ideal both at home and abroad, the artists used them as a vehicle to experiment with various imaginative ideas and artistic techniques, achieving truly stunning results.

panorama

From Marulić to Krleža: Croatian literature across the centuries

Helena Cuss explores the work of two luminaries of Croatian literature, one of them being the father of Croatian literature while the other is considered Croatia's greatest modern writer. Both of them helped to define a national literature and identity in times of uncertainty and doubt.

poetry

Irena Delonga Nešić: A note to yourself

Irena Delonga Nešić (Sinj, 1984) is a Croatian poet and former editor of the The Split Mind magazine. In 2010 she published a poetry volume ''Riječi kupuju zločine koje ćeš počiniti" and was awarded Goran prize for young poets. She lives in Split, where she hosts literary events.

interview

Ernesto Estrella on The Voice Observatory

The guest of the first Lit Link Festival, held in Rijeka, Zagreb and Pula in 2013, unveils his, by all accounts, unique work of art.

poetry

Marko Tomaš: Poems

Marko Tomaš (Ljubljana, 1978) was one of the founders and editors of the Kolaps literary magazine in Sarajevo. He has worked as a journalist and radio speaker and has published extensively all across the region. He is a poet of a rare sensuality and emotional refinement with a rarefied bohemian touch reminiscent somewhat of young Leonard Cohen. Publications: Hands Under Head (2002), Mama I'm Successful (2004), Life is a Joke (2005), Marko Tomaš and Other Poems (2007), Goodbye Fascists (2009), Midnight Conversations (with Mehmed Begić) (2012), Boulevard of the People's Revolution (2013), The Black Prayer Book (2015).

news

Dubravka Ugrešić, winner of the Neustadt Prize

Dubravka Ugrešić announced as 2016 winner of prestigious Neustadt International Prize for Literature

review

Farewell, Cowboy by Olja Savičević review - coming of age in small-town Croatia

THE GUARDIAN, Sat, 9 May 2015
by: Kapka Kassabova

The publication of this dazzling, funny and deadly serious novel will bring nourishment to readers hungry for the best new European fiction... With this novel, which lodges itself in your chest like a friendly bullet, a glorious new European voice has arrived.

prose

August Šenoa: The Goldsmith’s Treasure

Numerous tales and legends exist in Zagreb and about Zagreb; some are remembered through the ages, other sink into oblivion, and even the origin of some is forgotten over time. August Šenoa’s The Goldsmith’s Treasure has successfully endured the test of time. It captivated audiences at the end of the 19th century, and still manages to do so today. Intertwining love and history, The Goldsmith’s Treasure tells the most genuine tale of Zagreb – it leads us into the Upper Town, back to the 16th century, introducing us to its own Romeo and Juliet.
Deciding not to let this tale be forgotten, the publisher, Spiritoso, reached for Croatia’s rich cultural heritage and gave The Goldsmith’s Treasure a new sheen. The novel is now available to visitors who want to get to know Zagreb in a truly unique way and take home an authentic keepsake – a book. The Goldsmith’s Treasure, translated from Croatian by Neven Divjakinja, is available in English for the first time ever.
The book owes its design and layout to Hamper studio, which managed to combine the traditional and contemporary, the decorative and the minimalistic, as well as the rustic and the elegant.
You can read the 1st chapter here.

prose

Peter Dentchev: I will be the mole over your upper lip

Peter Dentchev is a young and prominent Bulgarian fiction writer and theatre director whose novel “Just like a Man Kisses a Woman He Loves” won the first place at the contest for Best New Bulgarian Novels “Razvitie” in 2007. The next year the same novel won the special prize of “Raiffeizen Bank” at South Spring National contest. In 2008 with his short novel “Simple Story” he wins the second place at Ciela’s Novel Prize Competition. His latest novel, Silent Sun, was published in 2012.

prose

Stela Jelinčić: A Weed is Just a Plant Growing in the Wrong Place

STELA JELINČIĆ was born in Zagreb in 1977. She worked as an editor in a Croatian pop-art magazine, as well the editor for Konzor Publishing from Zagreb. Korov je samo biljka na krivom mjestu is her first book, which launched her as a young author of a peculiar style. In her writings she describes the subjective reality of a generation brought up in the dawn of post communist transition, followed by war and social double standards.

prose

Michael Stein: Death in Omsk

"Death in Omsk", the story we are presenting you, is deeply Slavic, with all the paradoxes of the transitional phase in former communist countries. Michael Stein, Philadelphia-born writer and journalist living in the Czech Republic, has written about Russia in the 1990s, mixing the American and Russian points of view. What is a field of "infinite opportunities" for one character is a curse for another. This is a story about dark, illicit contracts, futures lost and found, and pulling your roots up from the ground...

prose

Edo Popović: Naked City

Edo Popović, born 1957 in Livno (Bosnia), is a Croatian author and journalist, co-Founder of literary magazine Quorum and of the Festival of Alternative Literature (FAK). His debut short-story collection Ponoćni Boogie/Midnight Boogie (1987) became a generation´s cult book. The author then took a long 13-year break from writing. He returned to it around the end of the 1990s. From 1991 till 1995 he worked as a war reporter. In Germany, Edo Popovic´s novels have been published by Voland & Quist. “War is not the key for understanding my prose. There is no universal key. Each book is unique, as any human being, any squirrel, any sip of tea. Literature stirs from life – from places you have lived, jobs you have done, books you have read.”

Farewell Cowboy, by Olja Savičević: a beautiful, subversively appealing novel

THE IRISH TIMES, Sun, Apr 5, 2015

by Eileen Battersby

In Dada, the Croatian writer Olja Savičević has created a compelling witness who is also a survivor, not particularly heroic, but likeable and sympathetic.

essay

JURE KAŠTELAN: Dragutin Tadijanović and his poetry

The following article is about Dragutin Tadijanović (1905 –2007), one of the most popular and influential Croatian poets of the 20th century, and was written by Jure Kaštelan (1919 - 1990), also one of the most important Croatian poets. The article was originally published in the Bridge Literary Review (number 3 from 1980).

poetry

Nikola Šop: Poems

Mathematical concepts and geometric bodies, from being external become inner poetic symbols, and cannot from now on be subjected to the logos of the poetry, yet – from a completely principled point of view – the latter is not essentially opposed to mathematics.

Višnja Machiedo, The vivacious geometry of Nikola Šop

prose

Robert Međurečan: from the novel "Slightly used medals for sale"

Robert Međurečan (b. 1969) - veterinary school dropout (will never finish), former soldier (definitely never again), musician and singer (more and more). He says he's a real Balkan homo universalis – he knows all the things he never went to school for. His first novel For Sale: War Medals, First Owner (2008) entered the shortlists for the main national book prizes (Jutarnji list, Tportal, the MH prize, the HPB prize). The novel Silence of the lambs in Zdihovo (2011) was on the long list for the Jutarnji and Tportal awards. His third novel, with the working title Galloping Birds will be published late this year, as a sort of conclusion to the "war trilogy".

prose

Davor Mandić: Romi

Davor Mandić was born in 1976 in Pula. During studies in Rijeka he started writing poems, short stories and book reviews. After graduating he started working for the national daily newspaper Novi list, based in Rijeka, where he still works as a journalist and commentator, covering Croatian literary and culture scene. He has published: Mostovi (Bridges), a book of poetry (2009), and Valjalo bi me zamisliti sretnim (One Should Imagine Me Happy), a collection of short stories (2014).

poetry

Arian Leka: Poems

Arian Leka (1966) belongs to the group of authors, which have come to the forefront after the opening of the Albanian borders and are considered to be avant-garde. By origin from the port city of Durres, this author, except modernity, weaves a whole mythology around his homeland, making the principle maritime symbols regards in his work as a poet, short story writer, novelist and essayist too, and transforms also them in a new living aesthetic and urban language, signing the multicultural life of this city. He studied music at the Jan Kukuzeli’s Music Academy. He is the author of 15 books.
For his creativity work Arian Leka received numerous literary awards for his poetry in his country and abroad.

prose

Maša Kolanović: FROM iMurica

Maša Kolanović (Zagreb, 1979) is an author of five books, including three books of fiction.
Her novel Underground Barbie (2008) is translated in German. She works as a lecturer of contemporary Croatian literature at the University of Zagreb. She holds PhD in literary history and cultural studies. Her disertation is published with the title Worker! Rebel? Consumer...: Popular Culture and Croatian Novel from Socialism to Transition (2011). She was a research fellow at the Universtiy of Vienna in 2006 and University of Texas at Austin in 2012.
Her book Jamerika (2013) is an ilustrated book of fiction.

poetry

Marko Pogačar: Poems

Marko Pogačar was born in 1984. in Split. He is an editor of Quorum a literary magazine, and Zarez, a bi-weekly for cultural and social issues. His publications include four poetry collections, three books of essays and a short story collection. He was awarded for poetry, prose, and essays, his texts appeared in about thirly languages.

prose

Ivana Kovačić: Parafairytale (two excerpts from the novel)

lvana Kovačić was born in 1979 in Split. She finished elementary and high school on the island of Hvar, and studied Croatian and Russian languages and literature at the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb. She does various occasional jobs, translation, writing and participation in art and activist projects. She lives in Zagreb. Her novel Parafairytale (2013) - which touches on motives of a father’s death and coming out - had a very good critical reception.

prose

Enver Krivac: Wormrumours and Thumbelinas

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

Enver Krivac (1976.) is a multidisciplinary artist from Rijeka.
Versatile in his expression, inspired by pop-culture and extra-literary sources, Krivac produces short stories, comics and music described by the critics as poetic, imaginative and playfull. His short stories collection „Nothing to write about home“ (2013) won the national literary award Prozak, and was proclaimed by the critics as „an encyclopedia of ideas, but also of many possible approaches to changing those ideas to literature“. He is known for his experimenting with language, aesthetics and humor. His writing style has „a simplicity that both enchants and frightens“. He is also a member of a musical collective Japanese Prime Ministers in which he acts as a co-author and a producer.

prose

Dalibor Šimpraga: In the tram / The Storm

Dalibor Šimpraga was born in 1969 in Zagreb, where he lives today. He studied Croatian and Southern Slavic Literature and Linguistics in Zagreb. He was a free-lance author, now he is cultural editor of Globus, the main news-magazine in Croatia. He was a co-founder of the literary magazine Fantom slobode. He has published:Anastasia, a novel (2007), and Kavice Andreja Puplina, a collection of short stories (2002). He edited 22 u hladu, an anthology of young Croatian prose (1999). For his debut novel Anastasia, he received the literary prize ”roman@tportal.hr" (one of main prizes in Croatia) in 2008.

poetry

Željka Horvat Čeč: Poems

Born in Čakovec, in the year of Chernobyl and Maradona (1986). Published a book of poems The stars also laugh at frailty (2005) and was one of the authors in the poetry collection There are better things than dry clothes (2007). She was awarded at a competition for the short story "Zlatko Tomičić’ and published a short story collection The cowboy in the red Golf (2010). Published in literary magazines and attended various festivals. She won the first prize for poetry at the Ulaznica 2013 literary competition. In her poems and stories she speaks openly and without compromise. She organizes literary evenings and discussions. She lives in Rijeka, likes sarcasm, football and making a mess.

prose

Zoran Žmirić: Beardy (excerpt from the novel "Blockbuster")

Zoran Žmirić (1969) is a writer and musician from Rijeka. His publications include two short story collection, a book of essays and a novel. He was a finalist for 2008 national Best Unpublished Manuscript with the novel Blockbuster (published 2009) and a finalist for the national "roman@tportal.hr” Prize (2010) for the best novel. He has been awarded with "Literary Pen" for the Blockbuster by the Croatian Literary Society (Rijeka), and The City of Rijeka Award (2011) for special achievements in culture. His works are translated into Polish and Italian. He plays bass in three-decades lasting rock group Grč from Rijeka.

prose

Jasna Žmak: Three stories

Freelance dramaturg, playwright and scriptwriter, assistant researcher at the Department of Dramaturgy at the Academy of Drama Art of the University of Zagreb where she graduated in 2011. She is the co-screenwriter of three short feature films. Her author script was chosen as a part of the Zagrebačke priče 2 (Zagreb Stories 2) omnibus. She coordinates the screen-writing project Hrvatski filmski savez Palunko (Croatian Film Clubs' Association Palunko) and the editor of the screen-writing portal palunko.org. Since 2009 she is the director of the advanced screen-writing workshop in Kino klub Zagreb (Cinema Club Zagreb) and the art editor of Filmske mutacije – festival nevidljivog filma (Film Mutations – Invisible Film Festival). As an attendant she took part in several screen-writing workshops (Sarajevo Talent Campus, Visions of Paris...), and also as a member of the jury in several screen-writing competitions. As a dramaturge she worked together with producers Oliver Frljić and Borut Šeparović. She is a member of the editorial staff of the magazine for performing arts Frakcija (Fraction) and web portal drame.hr. She publishes short stories and critical reviews.

prose

Ksenija Kušec: Matrix

Ksenija Kušec does not like banks or corporations. Actually, she does not like the rules that are over a man, the rules in whom feelings are excluded, the impartiality of those rules. Well, Ksenija Kušec is anything but impartial, at least in her stories and at least for now.
She wrote Tales from the Solar System that are 100% true, collection of short stories Tell me everything, which are mostly stories about the wicked husbands and how to treat them, and novel Janko and weather-machine.
She writes two novels at the same time and in the meantime does not write.

report

Lit Link Festival 2014 to be held Aug 28-30

The second edition of the "Lit Link" literary festival will take place in Pula, Rijeka and Zagreb on August 28-30, bringing together US, Canadian, British and Croatian authors and editors to promote Croatian literature abroad and foreign literature in Croatia.
The foreign guests will include authors Adam Mansbach, Miriam Toews, Sheila Heti, Shaughnessy Bishop-Stall and Kathryn Borel, editor Anne Meadows, author and editor Buzz Poole, editor Dan Simon, editor Zeljka Marosevic, editor Andi Winnette, and author, journalist and editor Michael Stein.
The Croatian authors to attend the event are Željka Horvat Čeč, Maša Kolanović, Ivana Kovačić, Enver Krivac, Davor Mandić, Robert Međurečan, Marko Pogačar, Ivana Simić Bodrožić, Dalibor Šimpraga, Bojan Žižović, Jasna Žmak and Zoran Žmiric.

poetry

Branko Maleš: Poems

Branko Maleš is one of the leading post-war Croatian poets. He is an important innovator in contemporary Croatian poetry, and among other things he coined the term “semantic concretes” and introduced it into literary criticism.

prose

Senko Karuza: Is There Life Before Death?

Friends, it seems my troubles are ending. Will this be enough? Is it worth it at all? Let me know, I’d like to know. I’d like to drink myself under the table!

poetry

Arsen Dedić: Poetry

Arsen Dedić was born in Šibenik in 1938. In his hometown he graduated from gymnasium and music school. For a while he studied at the Faculty of Law, but his love of music was stronger so he dropped law studies and turned to the Zagreb Music Academy, graduating from it in February of 1964. As a flautist he played in various ensembles and orchestras and founded the Flute Quartet. He was a member of several music groups such as Zagrebački vokalni kvartet, Prima, Melos et al. His primary orientation has always been toward music, but by uniting musical and poetic inclinations he naturally achieved a distinctive singer-songwriter expression, his most remarkable characteristic. His verses have been published in Polet, Prisutnosti, Književne novine, Književnik, and his first award was from the Split magazine Vidik. His first book – Brod u boci – was published in 1971 and sold in more than 60,000 copies. Zabranjena knjiga is his seventeenth book of poetry.

nevergreen

Davor Međurečan & Marko Meštrović: Silencium

The film is based on Miroslav Krleza’s The Ballads of Petrica Kerempuh (1936), one of the capital works of Croatian literature. The subject of this film is freedom. Freedom which cannot be trampled underfoot, as much as the powers that be would want that.

CM extensions

Discopath: The Rat Saviour (Izbavitelj)

Inspired by 1976 Croatian horror Sci-Fi film directed by Krsto Papić. This film's story is based on a book by the Soviet writer Alexander Greene.

poetry

Dražen Katunarić: Poems

Dražen Katunarić studied Philosophy at Strasbourg University. He composed prose, poetry, and essays. His works have been translated into English, French, German, Spanish, Slovenian, Bulgarian, Romanian, Corsican, and Italian. He has received several awards, including the literary award "Naji Naaman" (Lebanon 2004) and the literary award of Steiermärkische Sparkasse (2009). He was named a Knight of Literature (Chevalier de la littérature et de l'art) by the French Ministry of Culture.

report

Under the surface of the Balkan floods lies a social disaster

Srećko Horvat
theguardian.com, Thursday 22 May 2014

People from across the former Yugoslavia were helping one another, but their governments enabled the tragedy

writers

Tea Tulić

writers

Janko Polić Kamov

The Knight of the Black Swearword - the young man whose verses shocked his contemporaries.

Janko Polić Kamov (17 November 1886 – 8 August 1910) was a Croatian writer and poet.

writers

Drago Glamuzina

writers

Srećko Horvat

writers

Edo Popović

writers

Nikola Šop

Born 1904 – Died 1982

writers

Miroslav Krleža

7 July 1893 – 29 December 1981

writers

Vjekoslav Kaleb

September 27, 1905 – April 13, 1996

writers

Antun Branko Šimić

18 November 1898 – 2 May 1925

writers

Petar Šegedin

July 8, 1909 – September 1, 1998

writers

Vesna Parun

(10 April 1922 – 25 October 2010)

writers

Ivan Slamnig

(1930-2001)

writers

Vladan Desnica

(Zadar, September 17th 1905 – Zagreb, March 4th 1967)

prose

Petar Šegedin: Holy Devil

Petar Šegedin (1909-1998) was born in Žrnovo, on the island of Korčula. He worked as a professor and diplomat, and later as a professional writer.
From his debut novel, published in 1946, Šegedin's work broke away from socialist realism and (re)introduced existentialism into Croatian literature. He is also noted for his essays and travelogues.
Šegedin served as a president of Matica hrvatska and the Croatian Writers' Association. He was a full member of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts since 1963. Šegedin is the 1991 laureate of the Vladimir Nazor Award for Life Achievement in Literature.

prose

Vjekoslav Kaleb: A Stick for a Stall

Vjekoslav Kaleb (1905-1996) was a Croatian short story writer and novelist. He has published 57 short stories and three novels, most of which deal with existential struggles of people in the remote hamlets of the rural Zagora during wartimes.

In addition to writing screenplays, articles and reviews, Kaleb was also a translator, his most notable work being the translation of Carlo Collodi’s Pinocchio. Kaleb’s works have also been translated into Albanian, English, French, German, Italian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene and Macedonian.

prose

Vladan Desnica: The Visit

Vladan Desnica (1905-1967), born in Zadar, wrote poems, short stories and novels, usually dealing with the life in cities and villages of Northern Dalmatia. His best work is novel Proljeća Ivana Galeba (Springs of Ivan Galeb), published in 1957, in which he gives first-person account of an intellectual lying in hospital bed and meditating about illness and mortality. He died in Zagreb.

prose

Janko Polić Kamov: Bitanga

Rebellious by nature, Janko Polić Kamov (1886-1910) was expelled from Rijeka high school and dropped out of the school in Zagreb. Because of his participation in the demonstration against the Hungarian governor in Croatia, Khuen-Héderváry, he was sentenced to three months in prison in 1903. Headstrong and temperamental, he called himself Kamov, after Ham (or Kam) from the Old Testament, who saw his father Noah naked but unlike his siblings Shem and Japhet did not cover his nakedness, thus issuing a curse. Kamov probably saw himself as a revealer of bourgeoise hypocrisy and wrote to his brother Vladimir in 1910 - "Kamov to me is a literary program..."

prose

Neven Ušumović: Chikungunya (extract)

Of course he didn’t take him all the way to the Croatian border. He left him near Parecag, at a bus station. This driver didn’t say a word, he drove all to Koper in silence; all right, true, it was Monday, no one felt like talking. He only said srečno, wished him good luck, and motioned him to get out. He crossed the road and after only a few steps found the place where he could wait for another car.

poetry

Sibila Petlevski: Poems

These recent poems from the forthcoming collection Passwords of Oblivion exemplify the interplay in Sibila Petlevski’s work between the outer and inner worlds.

prose

Sibila Petlevski: Correspondence (excerpt from "A State of Twilight")

Sibila Petlevski is the author of 23 books in different genres of fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry.
Some of her sonnets originally written in English appeared in Douglas Messerli's anthology of world authors 50: A Celebration of Sun & Moon Classics (Sun & Moon Press, Los Angeles, 1995). Her poetry, drama and extracts from her fiction have been translated into numerous languages.
She won the "Vladimir Nazor" Award for literature for 1993. She also won the literary award for the best national novel published in 2009, tportal award, for her novel "Vrijeme laži".
"Correspondence" is an excerpt from "A State of Twilight", the third novel in the "Taboo" trilogy.

prose

Slađana Bukovac: Countryside - sample from an untitled novel

Listen to those mathematically identical pauses between the hoof beats, that trackless train engine which one must subordinate to one's own uncoordinated movements.

prose

Tea Tulić: The Hair is everywhere (Selection)

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

Tea Tulić was born in Rijeka (Croatia) in 1978. Her work was published in various Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian and Slovenian literature and cultural magazines including McSweeney’s from San Francisco. In 2011, she won Prozak, a literary award for the best young author’s manuscript, which resulted in publication of her first book, a fragmentary novel Kosa posvuda (Hair Everywhere). The novel received numerous positive reviews and was included in the top five prose books of the 2011 by Vijesnik daily newspaper, The Croatian Ministry of Culture awarded it as one of the best prose books in 2011. Hair Everywhere is also translated and published in UK, Italy, Macedonia and Serbia. In 2014. in cooperation with the musical collective Japanski Premijeri, she published spoken word album Albumče on Bandcamp.
She is a jury member of international short prose competition Lapis Histrae and a member of RiLit, a non-formal group of writers from Rijeka. Her new novel “Maksimum jata” (Flock’s maksimum) is recently published.

prose

Vladimir Stojsavljević: Pula

In that rested 1995 in Pula I ran a theatre workshop for young literati, to which many applicants applied, high schoolers and perennial college students, and one employee of the Cement factory, then an infamous ecological timebomb. It looks like the idea to call the workshop "Joyce Was In Pula, Too" contributed to the great interest from talented idlers, jokey young men and women, among whom the most attractive was a certain mysterious Una.

review

Dubravka Ugrešić's Europe in Sepia

MUSIC & LITERATURE
22 Apr 2014
by Madeleine LaRue


Dubravka Ugrešić is a Croatian writer living in Amsterdam, which, as she remarks, tongue firmly in cheek, “is just the sexiest thing ever.” Ugrešić is always the first to subvert her own glamour. Indeed, she has distinguished herself throughout her thirty-year career by refusing to accept the romance, by staring down nostalgia until it splinters apart like her former homeland.

writers

Dorta Jagić

poetry

Anka Žagar: Poems

Anka Žagar was born in 1954 in Zamost, in the Gorski Kotar region of Croatia. She attended elementary school in Plesac, and high school in Cabar. Žagar graduated in Croatian and comparative literature at the Arts Faculty in Zagreb, and currently works as a librarian. One of the most acclaimed Croatian poets, she has published six books of poetry and a number of collector’s editions, illustrated with original etchings by famous Croatian graphic artists.

prose

Boris Dežulović: The Red Devil

BORIS DEŽULOVIĆ was born in 1964, in Split. From 1988, together with Predrag Lucić and Viktor Ivančić, he edited Feral, the satirical supplement of Nedjeljna Dalmacija and Slobodna Dalmacija; in 1993 they established it as the independent weekly Feral Tribune. Since leaving Feral in 1999, Dežulović has been an ongoing columnist for Globus (Zagreb), as well as a regular contributor to a wide range of media in the region. He lives and works in Split.

Dežulović’s publications include the novels Christkind and Jebo sad hiljadu dinara (Who Gives a Fuck About a Thousand Dinars Now) as well as story, column and essay collections. “The Red Devil” comes from a 2007 collection of short stories Poglavnikova bakterija (The Führer’s Bacillus).

prose

Mima Simić: Boys Don't Cry

Mima Simić, born 1976, graduated from Zagreb Faculty of Philosophy with a degree in Comparative Literature and English Language and Literature, and also holds an MA in Gender Studies from the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest. She is a writer, translator, and a cultural, gender and film theorist. So far she has published a collection of short stories Adventures of Gloria Scott (AGM, Zagreb, 2005) and had numerous short stories published in Croatian and international literary magazines and similar publications. Her stories have been included in several Croatian and international anthologies. She is a member of the editorial team of Sextures, E‐journal for Sexualities, Cultures and Politics, and on the editorial board of Ekviva ‐ the regional women's web portal.

prose

Drago Glamuzina: Three

Drago Glamuzina was born in Vrgorac in 1967. His publications include Mesari (Butchers, poetry, Naklada MD, Zagreb, 2001), Tri (Three, a novel, Profil, Zagreb, 2008), Je li to sve (Is That All, poetry, VBZ, Zagreb, 2009), and a book of selected poems called Sami u toj šumi accompanied by photographs by Stanko Abadžić (Alone in that Forest, Bibliofil, Zagreb, 2011). The novel Tri (Three) won the T-portal’s Award for the best Croatian novel published in 2008. Besides Croatia, Tri appeared in Serbia (Rende, Belgrade, 2009), Macedonia (Makedonska reč, 2009), and Slovenia (Beletrina, 2013), while its German translation is forthcoming.

news

The Eastern Iowa Gazette reviewers selected Perisic's Our Man in Iraq as one of their favorites in 2013

Gazette book reviewers who have shared their insights about more than 100 books in 2013 were asked to name just five favorites from the long list of books they read this year.

One of them, Laura Farmer, include in her favorites “Our Man in Iraq” by Robert Perisic. She wrote that this was one of the most striking novels of the year. When Boris begins sending incoherent reports back to Croatia from Iraq, Toni, Boris’ cousin, rewrites them, blurring the line between truth and fiction and raising points about the role of the media, truth, and the chances we take in life to do what we think is best.

prose

Bekim Sejranovic: A Better Place

Bekim Sejranović was born in 1972 in Brčkol. He completed the Maritime High School, nautical course, in Rijeka in 1989, and earned his Master’s Degree in South Slavic Literature in 1999 from the University of Oslo. He has worked as a university lecturer, court interpreter for Norwegian, teacher of Norwegian for foreigners, postman, construction worker, sailor, etc.
Bekim is also active as a translator of Norwegian authors to Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian.
He lives and works in Ljubljana, Rijeka, Brčko, Oslo, Stari Grad (on the island of Hvar) and some other places, wherever life takes him.

poetry

Dorta Jagić: Some Selected Poems

Dorta Jagić writes poetry, short prose pieces, drama and theatre reviews, and translates from English and German. Since 1999 she has been involved with various amateur theatre groups as a director and educator.
Her work has been widely translated.
Her poetry has been awarded in and outside Croatia.

panorama

A Little-Known Story about a Movement, a Magazine, and the Computer’s Arrival in Art

New Tendencies and Bit International, 1961–1973

published by ZKM / Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe and The MIT Press, documents a short but intense artistic experiment which took place in Zagreb fifty years ago, but whose impact has been felt far beyond that time and place.

panorama

An overview of e-book market in Croatia

The e-books research project ~ funded by Vetenskapsrådet - the Swedish Research Council

By Zoran Velagić and Franjo Pehar

Not much has been written about e-books in Croatia, another European small language market which shares some common traits with other similar milieus, but proves some distinctions as well.

Prosa

Josip Mlakić: A Summer Journey

At dusk, we entered a small town called S. that had been taken that day. I, colonel Petrovic, the commander of the second battalion, his driv¬er and a person from Belgrade called Markica were in a carelessly paint¬ed greyish-olive jeep with its previous white, UN colour showing through. Everyone in the brigade called Markica Aids. He was a thin and pale young man who was with Arkan when the war started. He was dressed up as if going to a parade, and over his back he had a long dag¬ger just like some post-apocalyptic samurai, even though it made the ride unbearable for him.

writers

Josip Mlakić

BIO - BIBLIOGRAPHY

essay

Mladen Urem: An introduction to the Croatian avant-garde writer Janko Polic Kamov

Any comparative historical analysis of literature demonstrates from the context of examination that a point of division, a beginning or foreshadowing of something new, is present in various places. This time, aside from the usual division, let us consider the special status of the fin de siècle as an inherently undefinable yet sufficiently recognizable category and a motif for discussion of the intercontinentally virtually unknown but very important Croatian writer Janko Polic Kamov.

panorama

Overview of contemporary Croatian literature - Time Out

TimeOut Croatia gives a showcase of Contemporary Culture talent from the EU's newest member: art, film, music, design, architecture, fashion, literature, theatre... Read more about Croatian writers, and get an excellent overview of the present Croatian literary scene, at TimeOut Croatia‘s site.

poetry

Ivan Slamnig: Poetry - a brief selection

Ivan Slamnig (24 June 1930 - 3 July 2001), a Croatian poet and novelist, is considered one of the most important Croatian poets of the 20th century. His laconic, humor-infused modernist poetry is difficult to categorize, and proved popular with the critics and the public alike.

prose

Vlado Bulic: Brodosplit

The Brodosplit I know is in my family's photo albums. In the two most important ones - the white one and the black one, which were the first things packed whenever we moved, and finally settled down in Split's Sućider neighborhood, in an apartment Ma and I got from Brodosplit. In the white one are photos of my parents' wedding, and in the black one photos of my father's funeral.

poetry

Dinko Telećan: Poems

Poet and prose writer Dinko Telećan won this year's European Prize for Poetry at the Festival of Poetry in Curtea de Argeş.

review

Our Man in Iraq by Robert Perisic

World Literature Today, September 2013.
by Michele Levy, North Carolina A&T University

This postmodern, postcommunist picaresque hilariously skewers Croatian, Western, and global culture as it follows the rapid descent of quasi-journalist Toni

news

Literary Link - LitLink at UNIRI Library

uniri.hr

At the University Library in Rijeka at the American Corner, the LitLink programme will be held on Friday, September 27th, from 4:00 PM to 4:45 PM in the Glagoljica exhibition hall, with american writers Elianna Kan and Ernesto Estrella as guests .

news

Lit Link Festival 2013

26th-28th of September 2013

Pula 26.9. - Rijeka 27.9. - Zagreb 28.9. 2013.

The first edition of the festival hosts American writers, publishers and editors.
A number of Croatian authors present their work.
Lit Link Festival wants to induce the two-way exchange of fresh information.
Readings: Heidi Julavits, Damir Karakaš, Tao Lin, Zoran Ferić, Ernesto Estrella, Marinko Koščec, James Hopkin, Vlado Bulić, Buzz Poole, Sibila Petlevski, Renato Baretić, Tea Tulić, Bekim Sejranović, Drago Glamuzina, Nikola Petković, Vedrana Rudan, Slađana Bukovac, Gordan Nuhanović, Vladimir Stojsavljević, Drago Orlić, Neven Ušumović
Lectures and discussions: Richard Nash, John O’Brien, Elianna Kan, Buzz Poole, Gaston Bellemare...

review

FROM ZAGREB WITH ANOMIE

Steven Wingate
From: American Book Review
Volume 34, Number 4, May/June 2013


Perišić neither sentimentalizes or demonizes the worship of global capital, making his novel that much more tough-minded.

review

The First Rule of Swimming

Washington Independent, by Amanda Holmes Duffy, July 3, 2013

The yearning for and promise of refuge are symbolized by a fictional Croatian island in this novel about two devoted sisters, survivors who learn that the first rule of swimming is to stay afloat.

review

Staying Afloat - Courtney Angela Brkic’s ‘First Rule of Swimming’

The New York Times, by BROOKE ALLEN, July 12, 2013

The violent history of postwar Croatia, from 1945 until the turn of the millennium, created three generations of dislocated people. Some were dislocated from home and roots: many thousands fled their homeland during the years of Yugoslav Communism, with its informers, “eliminations” and prison camps. Others, who stayed on, were dislocated from their history as the Communist authorities rewrote the past, a process that continued during the bloody Balkan wars of the 1990s. And dislocation, as always, extended into the psychological realm: timeless ideas of value and even truth were warped by decades of lies.

report

Croatia: meet the new EU neighbours

James Hopkin
The Guardian, Monday 1 July 2013

Contemporary Croatian literature, in particular, is fast gaining recognition. Josip Novakovich was recently shortlisted for the Man Booker international prize, as was Daša Drndić for the Independent foreign fiction prize. Then there's Robert Perišić, Slavenka Drakulić, and Zoran Ferić.

Zagreb is crammed with cultural sites, including the impressive new Museum of Contemporary Art, and in spring and autumn the city is alive with weekly festivals such as the Subversive film festival (this year speakers included Oliver Stone and Slavoj Žižek).

news

Croatia’s biggest leap since independence

Independent, 16 June 2013, by Keith Micallef

The 1st July is seen by many as a historic day in Croatia’s relatively brief existence as an independent state, marking the country’s accession to the EU. Twenty-two years have passed since the country declared its independence from Yugoslavia. Before that, Croatia’s only experience as an independent state was between 1941 and 1945, as a German puppet state under Nazi leadership. After a civil war that ended in 1995, EU membership was only a distant image on the horizon. Yet, after a prolonged negotiation period spanning more than six years, in 2011 Croatia finally received the green light to join the elite club, two years later.

essay

The Mediterranean: Room without a view

Jurica Pavicic
Wespennest, Eurozine

The mythical Mediterranean of the tourist imagination masks a reality of debt, stagnation and social decline. Yet the region colludes in its own downfall, writes Jurica Pavicic, trading in former glories while acquiescing to political and economic exploitation.

interview

An interview with Damir Šodan

By poetryinternational / May 14, 2013

Poetry International, in collaboration with 3:AM Magazine, is pleased to showcase a group of amazing young European poets. Steven Fowler, the Editor of the Maintenant Interview Series, began this project in January 2010 as a result of experiencing the differing, and inspirational, attitudes of European poetic cultures and how they contrasted to the UK. He said “I really thought it was a shame that poets from outside of the English language in Europe were never recognised until they had reached middle age and a certain ‘prominence’ in their own countries. I also wanted to present a truly representative sense of what poetry is for different traditions and methodologies, from the most traditional to the most avant garde. ”

panorama

A glimpse into Croatian literature and what it brings to Europe

The Bright Old Oak, 5 June, 2013.

In less than four weeks Croatia will be the next country to join the European Union. The event will mark the first time since a former Yugoslavian country joins the Union after Slovenia, who had joined in 2004. Just six years after the end of the Croatian War of Independence, the nation has rapidly grown into a modern and flourishing country and is now ready to join in the other European countries from which it was long held apart from.

poetry

Olja Savičević Ivančević: Postcards from Istanbul (a selection)

Maybe it's time for a bit of poetic reflections from Istanbul.

writers

Renato Baretić

news

Trieste wins Independent Foreign Fiction Readers’ Prize

The winner of the 2013 Prize is 'The Detour' by Gerbrand Bakker, translated by David Colmer'. Themes of infidelity, exile and isolation won over the judges of this year’s Prize to give the author his second major prize win. His previous novel The Twin won the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Translator David Colmer will share the prize money with Bakker, in this unique award that recognises writer and translator equally.

essay

Where Are the Women in Translation?

Words without borders, By Alison Anderson, May 14, 2013

Alison Anderson is the author of two novels, Hidden Latitudes and Darwin’s Wink. Her translations include Leila Marouane’s Sexual Life of an Islamist in Paris, two novels by Sélim Nassib, Amélie Nothomb’s Tokyo Fiancée, Lifeform, and Hygiene and the Assassin, and Muriel Barbery’s Elegance of the Hedgehog and Gourmet Rhapsody. She lives near Lausanne, Switzerland.

panorama

The ten best Eastern Europen books you've never heard of

BY JEFFREY ZUCKERMAN, THE AIRSHIP, May 13, 2013

Black Balloon has just published Robert Perišić’s Our Man in Iraq, translated by Will Firth. Despite its title, the novel takes place almost entirely in Croatia and feels so deeply Eastern European in sensibility that I found myself jotting down other books from that region once eclipsed by the Iron Curtain’s shadow. Without further ado, here are ten brilliant and barely-known books from ten countries in Eastern Europe . .

report

Croatians in love with Scandinavian writers

Natasa Radic, Independent Balkan News Agency, 03/05/2013

At the recently held Noir Festival, which hosts the world’s writer stars that dominate the global top bestseller lists, one author had an extraordinary huge audience in Zagreb Kaptol Center, where the literary critic Mima Simic had a public interview with him. His name is Jo Nesbo, Norwegian crime novel writer, whose novel “The Snowman” has been sold out in Croatia. Perhaps the secret relationship between the famous Norwegian and readers in Croatia can be found in the fact that in his novel “The Savior” main character is a Vukovar defender during the Homeland war.

panorama

”Post-LondonBookFair Blues” and UK prizes for Literature in Translation

Istros Books, May 1, 2013.

Like many other small publishers, translators and authors, I find myself suffering from a touch of post-LondonBookFair Blues. While we were gearing up for the action – preparing PR material, making appointments, co-coordinating events and talks, it was all in the realm of Possibility – an exciting place without borders.

interview

The Perils of Transation, guest post by Will Firth

ANZ LitLovers, Lisa Hill, April 28, 2013

Last week in the course of my review of A Handful of Sand by Marinko Koscec, I had the pleasure of ‘meeting’ his translator in the conversation that took place in comments about the book. Will Firth is a multi-lingual Aussie translator who works in Berlin, translating Russian, Macedonian, and all variants of Serbo-Croatian. Born in 1965 in Newcastle, Australia, Will studied German and Slavic languages in Canberra, Zagreb and Moscow, and since 1991, he has been living in Berlin, where he works as a freelance translator of literature and the humanities.

essay

Srećko Horvat and Igor Štiks: Towards a Utopia of Democracy

27/04/2013

“A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at, for it leaves out the one country at which Humanity is always landing. And when Humanity lands there, it looks out, and, seeing a better country, sets sail. Progress is the realisation of Utopias.”


Oscar Wilde, The Soul of Man under Socialism

review

Co-Winner of April Essay Contest: They Would Never Hurt a Fly (2005)

Piše: Daniel Rusnak
Published Monday, April 15, 2013

In They Would Never Hurt a Fly, Slavenka Drakulic follows the stories of the Hague War criminals from the former Yugoslavia. Drakulic argues that ordinary men transformed into war criminals gradually through intensifying rhetoric containing a perfect storm of prejudice, myth, propaganda history and culture. Becoming a war criminal is a process, she claims, that does not affect only those who are “predisposed” or “inhuman.” Indeed, anyone can become a war criminal under the right circumstances. Even well meaning, civilized people like you and me.

review

An extraordinary novel succeeds on all fronts

The Gazette, Laura Farmer, 28 April 2013

Extraordinary novels do more than tell a good story; they cross multiple orbits, discussing family, love, politics, money and art. What’s amazing about Robert Perisic’s “Our Man in Iraq” is that it does all of the above — while also being wickedly funny.

review

Mama Leone by Miljenko Jergović

Mama Leone, by Miljenko Jergović (b. 1966), has an interesting structure: the first part of the book, “When I Was Born a Dog Started Barking in the Hall of the Maternity Ward,” is a novella narrated from the first-person perspective, while the second part, ”It Was Then a Childhood Story Ended,” is composed of twelve short stories written by an omniscent narrator.

review

Every Day, Every Hour by Nataša Dragnić

Michele Levy, World Literature Today

Readers and foreign presses have embraced Every Day, Every Hour as an enchanting first novel. Alas, however, its fairy-tale romance collapses under the weight of stylistic and structural contrivance.

interview

Under the Covers: A chat with Josip Novakovich

The George town, April 25, 2013

Josip Novakovich is a writer of short stories, essays, and novels, with many published to popular acclaim. He was recently shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize for “literary excellence… in a writer’s entire body of work.” Born in Yugoslavia in 1956, Novakovich grew up in Daruvar, in what is now central Croatia.

interview

The Normal World Believes Its Own Stability

An Interview with Robert Perišić by Steven Wingate

When your first book in the U.S. comes out with a front cover blurb from Jonathan Franzen, you’re usually in a pretty good spot. That’s where Croatian author Robert Perišić finds himself with the fine, just-released novel Our Man in Iraq, one of the first offerings from the relatively new press Black Balloon Publishing.
(The U.K. edition of the novel was published by Istros Books in 2012 and the original, Naš čovjek na terenu in Croatian, came out in 2007.)

review

After the war

Prospect Magazine / by J A Hopkin / January 24, 2013

Our Man in Iraq, by Robert Perišic

Robert Perišic’s wry novel Our Man in Iraq was a bestseller in his native Croatia, and its US edition has been endorsed recently by Jonathan Franzen. It’s easy to see why. With a nod to the great Ranko Marinkovic’s novel, Cyclops, in which a theatre critic and his boho-intelligentsia friends try to make sense of Zagreb during the second world war, Perišic maps and mocks the rapid changes happening to his city following the end of the Domovinski Rat—the brutal Homelands War of 1991-95 in which Croatia fought for independence from Serbia.

news

Our man in America

ROBERT PERIŠIĆ ON HIS FIRST AMERICAN BOOK TOUR TO PROMOTE HIS NOVEL, OUR MAN IN IRAQ.

Visit www.ourmaniniraq.com

news

Trieste, By Dasa Drndic

The Independent

Boyd Tonkin

Friday 19 April 2013

review

A Handful of Sand, by Marinko Koscec, translated by Will Firth

ANZ LitLovers LitBlog, Lisa Hill, April 20, 2013

A Handful of Sand by Marinko Koščec and translated from the Croatian by Will Firth, is billed on its blurb as an ‘ode to lost opportunity’ but I think it’s more than that. I think it asks, is it ever possible for psychologically damaged people to love? Or is it that they can only ‘sample’ what others have, only to lose it like sand slipping through their fingers?

news

Perisic's book launch in New York

Facing the U.S. tour of Robert Perisic

The author will undertake a North American reading & cultural tour. Inaugural U.S. Event will take place in New York City on Tuesday, April 23 at 7:00pm - Hausing Works, Bookstore cafe

review

Croatia via Iraq

Brave New Words, Thursday, April 18, 2013

B.J. Epstein

I had never read a Croatian novel, though I’ve been to Croatia, until a few months ago. Here’s my review of that Croatian novel in English translation. The review was published in Wales Arts Review.

Our Man in Iraq
Robert Perisic, translated by Will Firth

report

Final day of the London Book Fair

Istros Books, April 18, 2013.

report

Listen to conversations at the London Book Fair Croatian stand

Contemporary Croatian Literature at Keats House

Robert Perišić in conversation with Will Firth

Josip Novakovich in conversation with Marinko Koščec

review

A handful of sand by Marinko Koščec

Every time a book from Istros books drop through my door, I know for a fact I’m in for a treat so far this is my fourth books from every one as different as the one before but equally as brilliant as the one before so no to the book from Marinko Koščec. He is a lecturer in French literature for the university in Zagreb, he works as an editor for the Sysprint publishing house and also teaches novel-writing. He has so far published five novel his novel someone else won a big prize in Croatia, this book Handful of sand was nominated for the Jutarnji list award .

news

Trieste Is Shortlisted

The shortlist for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize is announced, and Daša Drndić is on it!

review

Boston Globe: ‘Our Man in Iraq’ by Robert Perisic

By Saul Austerlitz (Published on Apr 11, 2013)

Given the uncountable billions of words they have dedicated to the war in Iraq, it might be easy for Americans to think of it as belonging solely to them. Even its possession by the Iraqis can feel tenuous at times. So it is a refreshing reminder of the new global village to read a novel like Robert Perisic’s “Our Man in Iraq,” which studies the fighting in Baghdad from the distant shores of Croatia.

review

Toronto Star on Robert Perisic's novel

By: Emily Donaldson (Published on Fri Apr 12 2013)

"When I say Our Man in Iraq is likely to be the best novel you've ever read by a Croatian writer, I'€™m not just cynically gambling that you'€™ve never read any Croatian novels; or rather, I'€™m doing it secure in the knowledge that Robert Perisic'€™s first novel (originally published in 2007) is also terrifically witty and original."

news

Daša Drndić long-listed for the 2013 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize

Drndić was shortlisted for her novel Trieste, a story about Jews of Gorizia in Northeast Italy during World War II.
The Independent Foreign Prize honours the best work of fiction by a living author, which has been translated into English from any other language and published in the United Kingdom.

news

Perisic's novel selected as one of the Most Anticipated Books of 2013

A very popular American site on books and literary culture, The Millions, selected Robert Perisic's novel Our Man in Iraq as one of the Most Anticipated Books of 2013.

essay

The Third Reich in Contemporary Fiction

RICHARD MARTIN
http://www.alluvium-journal.org

"The third and final novel that I would like to consider here – Daša Drndić’s Trieste (first published in Croatian in 2007 and in English in 2012) – features a much looser collage of historical materials. These include photographs, maps, transcripts (some taken from the Nuremberg Trials, others imagined), extensive footnotes and biographical summaries. These fragments seem to comprise the research archive of the novel’s central (fictional) character, Haya Tedeschi, who is searching for her son..."

essay

Hyperparents

DRAGAN JURAK
www.zivljenjenadotik.si

The reigning model of hyper-parenthood makes parents extremely reduced people. All these people gathering around nurseries and schools may be perfectly interesting and nice. When it comes to their children, they absolutely identify themselves with their role as a parent and transform from complex persons into caricatures.

prose

Legend

Short story by ZORAN FERIĆ, from the collection Walt Disney's Mousetrap
Translated by Susan Curtis-Kojakovic

review

Croatia: from our own correspondent

ANN MORGAN, A year of reading the world

Our Man in Iraq by Robert Perišić, Istros books 2012

'It is a thoroughly enjoyable and thought-provoking story, which, while recalling some of the comic greats that have gone before, add its own brave, quirky and refreshing perspective to the tradition. An unexpected delight.'

poetry

The Market-place in Dubrava

Five songs by Krešimir Bagić
THE RISE - METAL'S PERFIDIOUS SONG - THE MARKET-PLACE IN DUBRAVA - BLAŽ BLAŽ BLAŽ - GASTON D.

interview

An interview with Neven Ušumović

"At the end of the 1990s, the prevailing trend in Croatian literature was neorealism: the consequences of war, the sudden impoverishment of wide sections of society, the brutality of the economic transition were foregrounded. In this decade, there is more experimentation: intermediality and crossover of genres offer particularly productive solutions for an inventive dialogue with social reality. It would please me if people outside Croatia read Robert Perišić, Zoran Ferić, Boris Dežulović and Marinko Koščec; then new writers such as Vlado Bulić and Zoran Pilić. They are characterized by harsh satire, uncompromising analysis of the social situation, and poetic inventiveness." - from dalkeyarchive.com

prose

Vereš

Story by Neven Ušumović
Translated by Celia Hawkesworth

The story "Vereš" is published in the collection "Best European Fiction 2010" (Dalkey Archive Press) edited by Aleksandar Hemon.

interview

An interview with Igor Štiks

"The nineteenth-century idea that literature could be neatly compartmentalised into 'national' literatures was always a problematic one but increasingly so in a world of intensive migration. My literary identity certainly moves beyond the linguistic limits of my language due to the Weltliteratur character of this particular art."

Interviewer: Špela Močnik, asymptotejournal.com

writers

Neven Ušumović

Neven Usumovic won critical acclaim for his collections of short stories. His story "Vereš" is published in the collection "Best European Fiction 2010" (Dalkey Archive Press).

review

Tim Judah on Our Man in Iraq

TIM JUDAH
Our Man in Iraq by Robert Perišić

In general terms, there are only a few tests of a good book. The first and really big one, however, is whether you want to know what happens next. The second, which obviously does not apply if you are reading science fiction or a historical romance, say, is whether you think, “Yes, exactly!” about descriptions of people and places. I am not Croatian, but I am a journalist and I know lots of the people in this book – not literally, of course, but I recognise their characters. All the way through, not only did want to know what happened next, but I kept thinking, “Yes, exactly!”

Tim Judah is Balkans correspondent of The Economist

prose

How to tie The Shoelaces

Three excerpts from the novel How to tie The Shoelaces by Nikola Petković, originally published in Croatia, entitled Kako svezati cipele (Zagreb: Algoritam, 2011). It is a short novel divided in three parts that deals with a father-son relationship. It relates a story of a complex, unfulfilled and rather traumatic memories of a child whose father left him when he was seven. Having autobiographical elements to it and being particular in a way it does not shy away from addressing the universal topic both known through the literary history and to the territory where it in fact takes place: a patriarchal country where such episodes are kept behind the veil of silence while culturally understood as something that comes with the territory, and, as such, is perceived experienced, understood and endured as something quite natural.
The three excerpts from the novel have a thin red line of a plot-tracing connected with the three wandering motifs as stated in each of their titles.

prose

The Hoppers

The short story by Nikola Petkovic, published in the Canadian Literary Quarterly Exile, Barry Callaghan, editor-in-Chief

writers

Nikola Petković

His scholarly and literary works as well as book reviews Petkovic publishes in numerous national and international periodicals. He is a weekly columnist in the newspapers Novi list where he writes on poetry. Nikola Petkovic is the president of the Croatian Writers Society

writers

Ivica Đikić

For his novel Cirkus Columbia (Edition Feral Tribune, Split, 2003) he received "Meša Selimović Award" for the best fiction book in Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro. The book speaks about individual and social breakdowns of the recent war taking place in Bosnian province. Academy Award winner Danis Tanović directed the movie Cirkus Columbia (2010) with Đikić as a co-screenwriter. The novel Cirkus Columbia is translated in Italian and Spanish. His latest novel is I dreamt the elephants (2011).

interview

An interview with Damir Karakaš

"You should look for the reason my character ended up the way he did in that context. Although this isn't an autobiographical novel, but a fiction with autobiographical elements, I happen to have ended up in that hell so I know well what I'm talking about. It's a beautiful building that tourists like to take pictures of, and I passed by it a hundred times and admired it, but I never dreamed that some day I'd end up deep under its foundations, in the catacombs where during the French Revolution they kept people about to be guillotined. This is a novel about a different Paris, a novel about demystifying illusions."

prose

Our Man in Iraq

Toni, the economics correspondent of a Croatian newspaper, initially thought it would be a brilliant idea to send his Arabic-speaking cousin Boris to Iraq in his place to report on the war. However, when all news from Boris suddenly stops, Toni's career - and his increasingly complicated personal life - is left hanging in the balance as he is forced to fake his cousin's reports...
The bestselling, internationally award-winning novel from Croatian writer Robert Perišić is now available in English translation.
Read an extract from "Our Man in Iraq", published by Istros Books in June 2012, translated from Croatian by Will Firth.

essay

Computer and Visual Research - Ways of Thinking and Scope of Acting

An essay by Matko Meštrović from his book Dispersion of Meaning - The Fading Out of the Doctrinaire World? (Cambridge Scholars Publishing):

In his letter addressed to the Zagreb Museum of Contemporary Art, in June last year, Frieder Nake asked a curious question: How did it happen that Zagreb for a few years became a very important place for this kind of art and visual research … (Frieder Nake, June 16, 2003).
When I recently received a copy of his letter I was quite embarrassed: How a man who visited that city for several times and regularly participated in activity of its museum from 1968 to 1973 could ask such a question? But trying to react, I found myself uncertain of what really was happening there in those five years.

news

New Meštrović's book published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing

After having published his book Dispersion of Meaning - The Fading Out of the Doctrinaire World? (2008), the same publisher CSP - Cambridge Scholars Publishing has just published a collection of nine inter-linked essays by Matko Meštrović under the title Towards a New Orientation. A Croatian version of the book, Prema novom usmjerenju, was published by Zagreb publisher Antibarbarus.

report

Literary Austerity Measures - Cut a Long Story Short!

An unofficial report from the Festival of the European Short Story in Zagreb and Pazin - by James Hopkin (Literature Across Frontiers), writer from Manchester.

"And this is the wonderful thing about the festival thus far: the opportunity for the writers and organisers to discuss each other’s work, the short story as form, in unhurried surroundings, unlike UK festivals where the writer is shipped in and out with the minimum of fuss or contact, and you usually don’t have the time or the opportunity to sit down with other writers. Here it is different."

writers

Matko Meštrović

Matko Meštrovic was a leading figure in the international New Tendencies (in Croatian: Nove tendencije) art-movement in the 1960s. His publications cover inter-disciplinary critical theory, art criticism, and new information technologies.
His books Dispersion of Meaning - The Fading Out of the Doctrinaire World? (2008) and Towards a New Orientation (2012) are published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

prose

Symmetries of a Miracle

Short story by Zoran Ferić from the collection An Angel in Offside (Anđeo u ofsajdu)
Translated by Tomislav Kuzmanović

prose

Zoran Ferić: Maya Calendar

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

An extract from the novel "Maya Calendar" (Kalendar Maja) by Zoran Ferić, translated by Tomislav Kuzmanović.
The novel has received three awards in 2012 - the Jutarnji List Award for the best work of prose fiction, the Vladimir Nazor Award and the Zagreb City Award.
Zoran Ferić was born in 1961 in Zagreb. He is among the most widely read contemporary Croatian writers. His works have been translated into English, German, Polish, Slovenian, Spanish and Hungarian.

prose

Barefoot Experience

Short story by Gordan Nuhanović

"I thoroughly enjoyed spending time with his characters, his quirky imagination, and unusual folklore. I also learned a great deal about the blossoming Croatian culture, which is still enjoying the expansion of urban sprawl. Rock music, odd obsessions with pristine, well manicured English lawns, and (don’t ask) gallstones become interesting symbols of normalcy. Although war and paranoia are still present within the stories, the reader is left with the impression that this violent consciousness is slowly evaporating."
The Literary Lollipop on “The Survival League"

interview

An interview with Gordan Nuhanović

In an interview with Ooligan Press, Gordan Nuhanović discusses writing The Survival League and his experiences as a Croatian author and journalist.

writers

Branko Čegec

writers

Krešimir Bagić

Krešimir Bagić has published several collections of poetry, as the sole author and in collaboration with others. In 2003 he published Le palmier se balance (Paris, Editions Caractères), a selection of his poetry in French translation by M. Andrašijević. He has published a series of essays and studies on Croatian literature.

prose

The Man for Cats

Short story by GORDAN NUHANOVIĆ, from 'Survival League' (Ooligan Press of Portland State University)
Translated by Julienne Busic

With edgy, evocative prose, Nuhanović weaves darkly optimistic tales where nothing ever works out quite right: English lawns grow daisies instead of grass, and a romantic weekend in the mountains turns into a near-death experience. Caffeinated punks, male pattern baldness, and Jehovah’s Witnesses are all part of the lives the characters observe or reclaim. Through Nuhanović’s natural storytelling voice, we hear the stories of survivors, not only of war, but of life and its spectrum—from the mundane to the insane.

writers

Gordan Nuhanović

His short stories have appeared in numerous literary journals, and his short story collections in Croatian include ‘The Survival League’ (2000), and ‘Battle for Every Last Man’ (2003). He is author of two novels - ‘Last Days of Punk’ (2006) and "Probably Forever" (2009).
His collection of short stories Survival League has been published in USA, Ooligan Press of Portland State University (2005).

review

Tainted Minds

MARK THOMPSON
The Times Literary Supplement, 01 June, 2012, Reviews, Fiction
Daša Drndić: TRIESTE
Translated by Ellen Elias-Bursać, 358pp. MacLehose Press

"With Trieste, the Croatian novelist and playwright Daša Drndić has bridged the gap between Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav fiction, between the work of Danilo Kis, say, writing in the Communist era, and that of Nenad Veličković or Vladimir Arsenijević, responding to the genocidal violence unleashed in the 1990s..."

prose

The Snake Collector

Jurica Pavičić's story translated by Marija Dukić.

Pavičić recently wrote: "Usually, trajectory of the fiction writer starts with writing short stories, with publishing of the stories in the magazines, an then, later, after the apprentice's maturity, comes Her Majesty- novel. In my case, history goes in an opposite direction. From late 90s, I published five novels, novels in which I tried to merge an elements of the unconventional, intelligent genre writing (thriller, crime novel) with social novel. After a decade as a novelist, I've started writing short stories and fell under the spell of it. After a long search, I've found out what kind of stories I write well: slightly longer, with longer time span, sometimes covering deacades, with more then a few characters in elaborate costellations – and yet, all that in short. Stories I like are like novels (or films) incapsulated in a small bottle."

writers

Jurica Pavičić

His novel Plaster Sheep (Ovce od gipsa) has been translated into German and published by Nummer 8. The book was proclaimed the third best book of the year in the German speaking countries in the category of crime stories and thrillers by the Swiss magazine Facts. The same novel was made into a film under the title Witnesses (Svjedoci), directed by Vinko Brešan and included into the programme of the Berlin film festival, where it received the Ecumenical Award.

poetry

100 PIECES by Vlado Bulić

In his Artist Statement Vlado Bulić asserts that for him literature should be a product of the author’s need to cope with the things around him which most often present themselves as problems causing frustration and frustration only. Bulić's book of poetry 100 Pieces (100 komada; published 2003) comes out of this frustration.
The poems in this volume allow to be read as true anecdotes about the daily existence of the individuals who do not have any perspective or objective in their lives.

poetry

LIGHT, SOMETHING FORTHCOMING

Marko Pogačar, poems, short selection

writers

Marko Pogačar

Marko Pogačar (1984) has been publishing poetry, prose, essays and literary criticism. He is an editor of Quorum, a literary magazine, and Zarez, a bi-weekly for cultural and social issues. Awarded with various prizes, he took part in literary festivals and manifestations worldwide.

essay

Lost in Castration

Tomislav Kuzmanović

But what happens when we try our hand at translating a thing such as penis; when we attempt to erect it in a sociocultural context different from its original context? Some expressions contain the word kurac (penis), but they cannot be translated into English without the word being lost. Even when they get translated into English and the word is kept, the whole spectrum of the meanings of the phrase containing it is lost. What gets lost here is crucial for understanding the text at its full and it will be the topic of the ensuing discussion.

prose

Journey to the Heart of the Croatian Dream

Vlado Bulić's novel Journey to the Heart of the Croatian Dream won the Jutarnji list Prize for the best book of fiction in Croatia in 2006.
This is a journey from “the shovel to the Internet” that could easily be read as the “journey” of the society on the whole.
Read sample translation from the novel translated by Tomislav Kuzmanović.

writers

Vlado Bulić

In 2006 Bulić published the novel A Journey into the Heart of the Croatian Dream (Putovanje u srce hrvatskog sna) which won the Jutarnji list Prize for the best book of fiction. A Journey to the Heart of the Croatian Dream, a collection of stories that can be read as an episode novel, is actually bildungsroman which follows his early years in war and post-war Croatia. This is a journey from “the shovel to the Internet” that could easily be read as the “journey” of the society on the whole.

prose

Wonderland

Sample translation from "Wonderland", a novel by Marinko Koščec, translated by Tomislav Kuzmanović.
Wonderland is an ironic portrait of Croatian academic community, epitomized by a 40-year-old professor of literature. His professional and family-life traumas, midlife crisis and fantasies of escape from the prison of his individual existence, intertwine with the context of syndromes related to societies in transition.
Wonderland was awarded with the prize «VBZ» for the best novel manuscript in 2003.

prose

Marinko Koscec: A Handful of Sand

Koščec's novel A Handful of Sand (To malo pijeska na dlanu, 2005), translated by Will Firth, is published by "Istros Books", London, in January 2013.
A Handful of Sand is a love story and an ode to lost opportunity.

writers

Marinko Koščec

His novel "Netko drugi" (Someone Else) was awarded with «Meša Selimović» prize 2002 (the best novel published in 2001 in Bosnia, Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro). The novel "Wonderland" was awarded with the prize «VBZ» for the best novel manuscript in 2003. English translation of the novel "To malo pijeska na dlanu" (A Handful of Sand, 2005) is to be published by “Istros books”, London, in Spring 2013.

about us

CriticalMass presents. . .

... writings of Croatian authors. And more.

essay

The Enemy Never Sleeps? Not Any More - Nowadays It Is Just Taking a Nap!

Robert Perišić

"The laziness became an ideological story so that we would not think about the system. In the past, everybody said that the enemy never sleeps. This is not the case nowadays. Nowadays the enemy is asleep far too often. He is taking a nap under a cypress tree, slowly sipping his uzo. The ideology of laziness has incidentally brought about a new kind of racism. And this ideological propaganda, as it always does, has taken root."

writers

Igor Štiks

He has published two novels - A Castle in Romagna (Dvorac u Romagni) in 2000 and Elijah's Chair (Elijahova stolica) in 2006. Elijah’s Chair (2006) received both the Award “Gjalski” and the “Kiklop” and it has been translated into a dozen European languages.

news

Horvat and Štiks in Monthly Review Magazine

An article 'Post-Socialism, the European Union, and a New Left in the Balkans', published in Monthly Review is a theoretical paper written by Srećko Horvat and Igor Štiks who are also the editors of theoretical part of the Subversive Festival in Zagreb.

writers

Zoran Ferić

Zoran Ferić (1961) is among the most widely read of contemporary Croatian writers. His work has received numerous prizes, including the Ksaver Šandor Gjalski Prize in 2000 and the Jutarnji List Award for the best work of prose fiction in 2001 and then again in 2011.His books were translated into English, German, Slovenian, Polish, and Hungarian.

writers

Slavenka Drakulić

Slavenka Drakulić is an author whose books and essays have been translated into many languages. In the USA, she has published five novels: Holograms Of Fear; Marble Skin; The Taste Of A Man; S. – A Novel About the Balkans (made into a feature film As If I Am Not There ); and Frida’s Bed.

news

Flesh of Her Flesh in English on Kindle

After Croatian, German, Swedish, Macedonian and Polish, Slavenka Drakulic’s autobiographical book is now available in English on Kindle.

"In 2004, I had successful kidney transplant surgery at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, USA. The kidney did not come from a deceased person or a relative as used to be the case for decades – but from an anonymous living donor. Not even being aware that this was a possibility, I was fascinated by this extreme case of altruism. It is not very often that one finds oneself confronted by an act of such goodness."

prose

Hotel Zagorje

The girl is nine years old when she is sent to the seaside in the summer of 1991 – but the holiday turns into a timely escape, because war breaks out in her hometown of Vukovar while she’s away. And her father has disappeared without trace...
The voice of the young narrator is deft and engaging as she unfolds the story of the life that follows in a refugee camp where She will spend the next six years together with her mother and brother.
Ivana Bodrožić's first novel Hotel Zagorje was published in 2010 receiving high praise from both critics and audiences. In 2012 it was translated into German and published by Hanser Verlag, which has bought the rights to the novel and its international promotion. This year it will also be published in France. As a co-scriptwriter Ivana Simić Bodrožić is currently working on the film adaptation of the novel with the renowned Bosnian director Jasmila Žbanić.

writers

Ivana Bodrožić

Ivana Bodrožić was born in Vukovar in 1982. In 2005, she published her first poetry collection entitled Prvi korak u tamu (The First Step into Darkness) as part of the Goran Award for young poets. Her poems have been included in numerous Croatian and international magazines and anthologies of
contemporary poetry.
Her first novel Hotel Zagorje (Hotel Tito) was published in 2010, receiving high praises from both critics and audiences and was an ultimate Croatian bestseller. Hotel Zagorje is a story about a coming-of-age within seven years of displacement and the endless waiting for news about a father listed as “missing”.
The novel has been published at numerous respectful publishing houses and received a prestigious Prix Ulysee for the best debut novel in France, as well as numerous important awards in Croatia and the Balkan area such as the Kočićevo Pero Award, Josip and Ivan Kozarac Award, and Kiklop Award for the best work of fiction in 2010.
She has since published her second poetry collection Prijelaz za divlje životinje (A Road for Wild Animals) and a short story collection 100% pamuk (100% Cotton), which has also received a regional award.
Her works have been translated to German, French, Czech, Danish, Slovenian, Spanish, Macedonian.

Leica format

Extract from the novel "Leica format" by Daša Drndić

editions and awards:
Leica format, «Meandar», Zagreb, 2003,
Leica format , "Samizdat B92", Belgrade, 2003.
(Nominated for «Vjesnik», «Jutarnji list», «Vladimir Nazor» and «Kiklop» awards for Book of the year 2004)
Leica formátum, Nyitott Könyvműhely, Budapest 2010, translation Viktória Radics
Leica format, Društvo 2000, Ljubljana 2011, translation Sonja Polanc

writers

Robert Perišić

"Robert Perisic is a light bright with intelligence and twinkling with irony, flashing us the news that postwar Croatia not only endures but matters." - Jonathan Franzen
"How deeply satisfying it is to hear Perisic’s wry voice take a different angle, and tell a different story."—ZYZZYVA

writers

Nenad Popović

1991 Co-founder of the publishing house Durieux. Durieux publishes books and, since 2003, the review Phantom of Freedom (Fantom slobode).
Books: In 2008, at Pelago, Zagreb, an essay about immigrant workers A world in the Shadow (Svijet u sjeni) and in Germany an anthology of new Croatian Prose, Kein Gott in Susedgrad (Schoeffling Verlag).

essay

Culture as Ressource

Nenad Popović

The irresponsibility of elites towards culture is today not that dangerous as it was at the end of the eighties and in the first half of the nineties. At least it is not dangerous in a direct way. Back then these elites were co-responsible or direct responsible for killings, tortures and destruction. Today they have restructured themselves. However, the priority national task of culture in each of these countries and nations should be to stop this strategy of mental and cultural crippling.

writers

Daša Drndić

In 2008 Sonnenschein was awarded the “Cyclops” Prize for the best novel of the year 2007, the “Fran Galović” prize as best prose work of the year 2007, and was nominated for the “Jutarnji list” award for the best prose work of the previous year. Her books have been translated into English, French, Polish, Hungarian, Slovenian, Dutch and Slovak.

panorama

Quorum Generation Prose

article by Krešimir Bagić
RELATIONS

"To the writers of the Quorum generation the most inspirational world literature writers are the short story authors Daniil Kharms, Dino Buzzati, Jorge Luis Borges and Raymond Carver, the autoreferential prose of Umberto Eco and Italo Calvino, and ‘hipster’ and erotic literature ranging from authors such as the Marquis de Sade to Charles Bukowski, Henry Miller and William Burroughs.It is generally possible to point out three prose models used by the writers gathered around the Quorum library and magazine: minimalist prose, conceptual prose and urban landscape prose."

prose

To Make The Dog Laugh

Olja Savičević Ivančević
Nasmijati psa, short stories, 132 pp., AGM, Croatia 2006

Nasmijati psa (To Make the Dog Laugh) is a collection of twenty-two short stories of different genres that deal with seemingly ordinary themes such as relationships between men and women, fringe groups, growing up, love, sickness, ageing and death. Savičević tells her stories with a casual precision, with sensitivity and sometimes spite, often with surprising turns or poetic flourishes, but she is always a master of observation. Ultimately there is a lot more to these "ordinary" stories than meets the eye.

"A colourful and bold book by a daring, imaginative author. The boisterous and unbridled style, vibrant with emotion, is topped off by many a beautiful ending. You put her down, glowing, and think: Wow! That's what you call literature."
Deutschlandfunk

"The Croatian writer Olja Savičević enshrouds our senses with her captivating short stories about breast cancer, anorexia and enslavement. She does not deliberately evoke the gravity of these issues, yet they creep into our consciousness. Suddenly we lost in this mesmerising mist and cannot escape. Nor do we want to."
blond

prose

Adios, Cowboy

Novel "Adios, Cowboy" by Olja Savičević Ivančević follows Dada who returns to her home town, in a suburb, in Mediterranean Dalmatia, where her brother Danijel committed suicide four years ago because of anti-gay bullying...

"… a wild ride through the dusty streets of a coastal city in Dalmatia; clouds of memories are stirred up and verbal hot lead fills the air. The dust settles to reveal a subtle and cleverly crafted family story, which revolves around a pervasive past waiting to be addressed."
Wortlandschaften

Look inside sample translation of the novel translated by Tatjana Jambrišak.

prose

Damir Karakaš: Perfect Place for Misery

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

An excerpt from the novel translated by Marino Buble.

The novel is about a young Croatian writer in Paris. Through his everyday struggle emerges a whole new parallel world of Parisian underground marked by immigrants literally trying to survive. He meets a girl from the Arab neighborhood in Paris, signs up for the university studying French language so he could have more success with the publishers as well as to get residence permit... The novel paralelly follows his adventure and his search for a publisher and success which ends with no positive result.

Damir Karakaš was born in 1967 in the village of Plašćica in Lika, the mountainous region of Croatia. He is the author of nine books, out of which there are three short story collections and four novels. His books were translated to German, Czech, Macedonian, Slovenian, Arabic... In 2008 a movie made according to his short stories collection Kino Lika was released, directed by Dalibor Matanić, winning numerous awards in Croatia and abroad.

writers

Damir Karakaš

In 1999 he published a book of travel prose ‘Bosnians are good folks’, followed by his first novel ‘Kombetars’ (2000) and short stories collection ‘Kino Lika’ (2001). Last one earned itself a cult status at the Croatian literary scene. His latest novel ‘Perfect Place for Misery’ was published in 2009.

review

Trieste, by Daša Drndić

Amanda Hopkinson

The Independent

Friday, 24 February 2012

This extraordinary work of fiction concludes with the narrator, Haya Tedeschi, reflecting on all she has compiled in eight long years of research and remembering. "I have arranged a multitude of lives, a pile of the past, into an inscrutable, incoherent series of occurrences... I have dug up all the graves of imagination and longing... I have rummaged through a stored series of certainties without finding a trace of logic."

writers

Olja Savičević Ivančević

Olja Savičević Ivančević doubtlessly belongs to a group of the best Croatian contemporary authors of younger generation. Her narrative style, vocabulary, plot structuring, construction of figures and types, basically all aspects of her literary expertise has been praised by acclaimed critics in Croatia, Serbia, Germany and elsewhere.

interview

That Which is Expounded as Unfathomable

Interview: Branko Čegec

"Quorum in its first phase, that is, in the first five years while I was editing it together with my editorial board, must in some way be understood as a generational magazine, for it is a fact that it was dominated by an upcoming generation. When I, as you put it, declined the possibility that Quorum might be a generational project, I primarily had in mind a comparison with the existing tradition of generational magazines in Croatia, such as Krugovi, Razlog or the first issues of Pitanja."

Interviewer: Tvrtko Vuković
RELATIONS

review

How Are You? by Barbara Matejčić, a review

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

"From time to time, a literary work would appear that would succeed in giving a voice to the voiceless ones. How Are You?, an excellent collection of short stories by a Croatian journalist and writer Barbara Matejčić, is one of these literary works.
The author has spent a period of her life with her characters, being with them, helping them and listening to their stories, and her method is hence intrinsically one typical of investigative journalism."
Saša Ilić, eurolitnetwork.com

prose

Tea Tulić: The Hair is everywhere (Selection)

LIT LINK FESTIVAL 2017

Tea Tulić was born in Rijeka (Croatia) in 1978. Her work was published in various Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian and Slovenian literature and cultural magazines including McSweeney’s from San Francisco. In 2011, she won Prozak, a literary award for the best young author’s manuscript, which resulted in publication of her first book, a fragmentary novel Kosa posvuda (Hair Everywhere). The novel received numerous positive reviews and was included in the top five prose books of the 2011 by Vijesnik daily newspaper, The Croatian Ministry of Culture awarded it as one of the best prose books in 2011. Hair Everywhere is also translated and published in UK, Italy, Macedonia and Serbia. In 2014. in cooperation with the musical collective Japanski Premijeri, she published spoken word album Albumče on Bandcamp.
She is a jury member of international short prose competition Lapis Histrae and a member of RiLit, a non-formal group of writers from Rijeka. Her new novel “Maksimum jata” (Flock’s maksimum) is recently published.

CM extensions

Film festivals in Croatia

The Croatian Audiovisual Centre currently co-finances 59 film festivals and other audiovisual events. These serve various functions: they are particularly important for promoting Croatian audiovisual creation and serve as a platform for screening artistic content and non-commercial film forms, which makes them relevant on a local, regional, national and, in some cases, international level.

report

The Little Black Egg: a punk excursion to Croatia

"It’s called Rijecki Novi Val. (Novi Val is Croatian for New Wave.) This is one of the best collections of anything I ever acquired. Punk and New Wave were huge in the Balkans. I said it once, and I’ll say it again: the ex-YU countries are responsible for the some of the best punk music made anywhere."

interview

An interview with Zdenko Franjić

Starting out in 1987, Croatian record label Slusaj Najglasnije! (or Listen Loudest!) documented many of Croatia’s greatest bands, including Majke, Hali Gali Halid, Satan Panonski, Bambi Molestors, and many others. Over time, Listen Loudest! evolved, and today releases music from artists the world around. The mastermind behind Listen Loudest, Zdenko Franjic, has been kept his label/life mission together for over thirty years without a break.

panorama

20 Essential Films for an Introduction to Yugoslavian Cinema

Once upon a time there was a country, and that country made films. The films produced in the former Yugoslavia remain fascinating for anyone interested in the country or in films. This list is by no means definitive, for Yugoslav cinema is too rich and varied for that. It is rather, a primer for those unfamiliar with the region, the best bits from each era and each generation.

panorama

Croatian Sites on UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List

A little know fact is that Croatia, together with Spain, have the most cultural and historical heritage under the protection of UNESCO, and Croatia has the highest number of UNESCO intangible goods of any European country.

panorama

Dancing under socialism: rare electronic music from Yugoslavia

In the last couple of years, various collections of electronic music from former Yugoslavia popped up, ranging from numerous downloadable CDR mixtapes to official compilation albums. Yet there are several more waiting in line to be pressed and, as you will see, these are most definitely worth waiting for.

news

First Croatian newspaper for asylum-seekers, refugees launched

The monthly publication was launched with the aim of establishing closer mutual trust and offering information to people who were forced to leave their homes in search of protection and security, it was said at the launch.
Most of the newspapers' authors are asylum-seekers.

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Croatian National Theatre in Zagreb

The National Theater in Zagreb, Croatia’s capital, is one of those things which always finds its way to every visitor’s busy schedule.

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Zagreb Festivals and Cultural Events

Numerous festivals, shows and exhibitions are held annually in Zagreb. Search our what's on guide to arts & entertainment.

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A History of Eastern European Matchboxes

Although they were produced under strict state-controlled production processes; that were aimed at exploiting them as a means of publicizing political initiatives, promoting public health and safety, and selling the communist ideal both at home and abroad, the artists used them as a vehicle to experiment with various imaginative ideas and artistic techniques, achieving truly stunning results.

Authors' pages

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